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3 TEMPLE GARDENS, 1ST FLOOR, TEMPLE, LONDON, EC4Y 9AU, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7353 7884
Fax:
Fax 020 7583 2044
Email:
Web:
www.templetax.com

London Bar

Set overviews: England and Wales

Covering all tax bases’, Temple Tax Chambers has a ‘versatile’ stable of counsel. ‘Faultless’ senior clerk Claire James ‘smoothly’ runs the ‘friendly, extremely helpful, and responsive’ clerks’ room. Lucy Campbell is the deputy senior clerk, while Cindy Green and Kaylin O’Rourke are the junior clerks. In December 2018, Julian Hickey moved over to 9 Stone Buildings, while in January 2019, John Baldry moved to O'Melveny, and Rebecca Murray departed for Devereux. Offices in: London

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London Bar

Set overviews: England and Wales

Covering all tax bases’, Temple Tax Chambers has a ‘versatile’ stable of counsel. ‘Faultless’ senior clerk Claire James ‘smoothly’ runs the ‘friendly, extremely helpful, and responsive’ clerks’ room. Lucy Campbell is the deputy senior clerk, while Cindy Green and Kaylin O’Rourke are the junior clerks. In December 2018, Julian Hickey moved over to 9 Stone Buildings, while in January 2019, John Baldry moved to O'Melveny, and Rebecca Murray departed for Devereux. Offices in: London

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Tax: corporate and VAT/indirect tax
Tax: VAT - Leading sets - ranked: tier 2

Temple Tax Chambers

Tax: corporate and VAT/indirect tax - Leading sets - ranked: tier 3

Temple Tax Chambers

Members of Temple Tax Chambers are all 'easy to instruct and to consult with' and demonstrate expertise in all areas of direct and indirect commercial taxation, according to instructing solicitors. In addition to strong advisory work, members are involved in a number of high-profile matters for taxpayers. Jonathan Schwarz appeared in Fowler v HMRC, a case revolving around the interpretation of tax treaties that concern the UK taxation of South African divers working in the UK sector of the North Sea. Lyndsey Frawley was instructed in BT PLC v HMRC, which regards a refund for overpaid VAT as a result of the UK's failure to implement an EU compliant bad relief regime between 1978 and 1989.Also of note, David Southern QC specialises in tax litigation, corporate finance, judicial review, and has substantial experience in cases involving overseas jurisdictions.

Tax: VAT - Leading silks

David Southern QC - Temple Tax ChambersNot only an excellent advocate, also a sharp and entertaining sparring partner to exchange thoughts with.

Ranked: tier 4

Michael Conlon QC - Temple Tax ChambersNoted for his practical and pro-active approach and attention to detail.

Ranked: tier 4
Tax: corporate - Leading Silks

David Southern QC - Temple Tax ChambersNot only an excellent advocate, also a sharp and entertaining sparring partner to exchange thoughts with.

Ranked: tier 3
Tax: VAT Leading juniors

Lyndsey Frawley - Temple Tax ChambersShe is an experienced VAT litigator; sensible and unflappable.

Ranked: tier 2

Tim Brown - Temple Tax ChambersHaving worked for HMRC earlier in his career he has a real understanding of how the department works.

Ranked: tier 2
Tax: corporate - Leading Juniors

Alun James - Temple Tax ChambersWell prepared, prompt advice and easily accessible; well-liked by his clients.

Ranked: tier 2

Jonathan Schwarz - Temple Tax ChambersStrong attention to detail, thorough review of the case, knowledge of transfer pricing law and relevant non-tax law.

Ranked: tier 2

Keith Gordon - Temple Tax ChambersHe is not “showy” as an advocate, but puts forward his arguments clearly and with authority.

Ranked: tier 2

Michael Sherry - Temple Tax ChambersExtremely knowledgeable and creative.

Ranked: tier 2

Philip Ridgway - Temple Tax ChambersStands out for his technical excellence, calm considered approach, congenial character.

Ranked: tier 2

Rebecca Murray - Temple Tax ChambersShe is a real star in contentious matters.

Ranked: tier 2

Ximena Montes Manzano - Temple Tax ChambersShe has a fierce intellect with an astonishing capacity to assimilate all of the relevant facts from extensive bundles of documents.

Ranked: tier 2

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Further information on Temple Tax Chambers (Temple Tax Chambers)

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London Bar

Offices in London

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