The Legal 500

London Bar

United Kingdom > London Bar > Professional negligence

Editorial

Index of tables

  1. Professional negligence - Leading sets
  2. Professional negligence - Leading silks
  3. Professional negligence - New silks
  4. Professional negligence - Leading juniors

Professional negligence - Leading silks

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Professional negligence - New silks

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Professional negligence - Leading juniors

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Professional negligence has proved to be a booming area in recent years as the recession sparked an increase in claims against professionals. Sets have reported a slight increase of cases this year as the limitation period for post-recession claims approaches. As a result, property-related matters and cases against legal professionals remain buoyant, while financial services disputes are also prominent. Sets are increasingly being instructed directly, possibly due to economic pressures on the client and cases with an international element are becoming more common as professionals are increasingly looking overseas to expand their business models.

‘So often the first port of call for professional negligence work', 4 New Square is an ‘excellent chambers with real strength in depth' and ‘a vast range of experienced individuals'. Recent highlights include London Underground v Freshfields and Herbert Smith, a dispute regarding the drafting of a failed private finance initiative contract for the modernisation of underground lines; the high-profile case Langstone Leisure & Ors v Pannone LLP & Ors; and significant breach of trust case AIB v Redler & Co.

‘A set of real experts for professional negligence work', 4 Pump Court is ‘a modern chambers with a strong offering at junior and silk level'. Core areas include IT, telecoms, construction, finance, insurance, legal and property related professional negligence disputes. Notable recent cases include Barclays v Knight Frank, regarding the valuation of a large portfolio of luxury hotels in the UK; Ronnie v Halliwells; and Barclays Bank International v Savills, Montague Lambert, Stocker and Roberts, regarding an alleged mortgage fraud.

‘A seriously impressive set that is packed with quality', 3 Verulam Buildings has ‘very strong credentials in financial services disputes', as well as insurance coverage matters and other professional disciplines. Standout cases for the set included Orlen Lietuva v Aon Limited, regarding an insurance brokerage negligence claim, and Pensioenfonds Vervoer v Goldman Sachs Asset Management Goldman Sachs.

Brick Court Chambers houses ‘an array of top-notch individuals for professional negligence matters' and provides ‘first-rate service'. It is active in finance, accountancy, tax, law and property-related disputes. Recent high-profile cases include Cattles Group Limited v PwC and Stichting Beheer Beroepsvervoer v Goldman Sachs Management International.

‘Thoroughly deserving of its excellent reputation', Wilberforce Chambers’ recent cases include the construction-related Accolade Wines Limited v VolkerFitzpatrick and others; and Park Lane Holdings v Dentons, examining an alleged drafting error. The set houses ‘strong individuals at all levels'.

The ‘top-notch' 1 Chancery Lane ‘fields a real depth of expertise in the professional negligence arena'. Although the set’s main emphasis is on defending professionals it undertakes work for claimants and defendants in litigation, arbitrations, mediations and construction adjudications, and is noted for its ‘first-rate' property-related professional negligence expertise.

The ‘efficient and helpful' team at 2TG - 2 Temple Gardens is particularly noted for its ‘promising array of juniors', as well as its experienced silks. It has ‘a strong construction practice', as well as expertise in a number of other sectors. Recent instructions include: AIG Europe v Douglas Jackson & Co, regarding the alleged misappropriation of funds by loss adjusters, and Woodman v International Law Partnership, regarding alleged solicitor and adviser negligence in overseas property deals.

A ‘first-rate professional negligence set' that has ‘a client-focused approach', Atkin Chambers is ‘outstanding for construction-related disputes' and has ‘excellent strength in depth'. Headline cases include Cadbury v ADT, regarding a fire that destroyed a Cadbury factory in Pontefract, and Accolade Wines Limited v Volker Fitzpatrick and others.

Crown Office Chambers is ‘rated very highly for professional negligence', and has ‘a strong array of experts'. Key highlights for members included appearing in the high-profile case Woolfe, Collyer Bristow LLP v Lockton International & others, and Roy Parker v Freeth Cartwright Solicitors, regarding solicitors’ negligence.

Fountain Court Chambers is ‘very strong, commercial and user friendly'. The set received high-profile instructions across solicitors, barristers, financial services and tax-related professional negligence. Recent cases include Levi Roots v Simons Muirhead Burton and London Underground v Freshfields and Herbert Smith.

Hailsham Chambers ‘offers serious strength for professional negligence', with ‘first-class barristers at every level'. Key cases included Hellard v Irwin Mitchell; Paratus (GMAC) v Connells, a Court of Appeal case regarding property valuations; and Wellesley LLP v Withers LLP, regarding alleged negligent drafting of agreements.

Maitland Chambers houses ‘consistently high-quality barristers', for whom notable cases included Makar v PwC, regarding auditors’ negligence, and Bhandal v Irish Nationwide Building Society, regarding the allegedly negligent sale of a high-value property in the UK.

The ‘first-rate' Serle Court has ‘strong individuals at both silk and junior level', and is ‘extremely experienced' in professional negligence work. High-profile cases have included Thwaytes v Sothebys, a claim for misattribution in relation to a high-value painting, and Roberts v Cavanagh Financial Management Ltd, regarding a claim by pension investors against IFAs following the collapse of an esoteric pension scheme.

7 King’s Bench Walk is ‘really first-rate for finance and accounting related professional negligence claims'. Recent cases include Cattles Ltd and Welcome Financial Services Ltd v PwC, which was an auditors’ negligence claim, and Primary Capital v Ernst & Young, regarding alleged negligence in conducting due diligence.

Keating Chambers is ‘one of the leading sets for construction work' and also handles professional negligence cases in the legal and IT sectors. It was instructed in high-profile cases such as Accolade Wines v GJ3 and others; Investec v Watts, a claim by the bank against managing surveyors; and UK Highways A55 Ltd and Others v Hyder Consulting UK Ltd and Hyder Consulting, a claim against the consulting engineers by a joint venture responsible for building a new road.

Radcliffe Chambers has ‘an excellent number of very able barristers for professional negligence matters', and is ‘always accommodating to the needs of the client'. The set was instructed in Jacobs v Sesame Ltd, a case regarding the alleged mis-selling of an investment product.

Selborne Chambers is ‘rated highly for professional negligence matters', and is particularly noted for its ‘deep expertise'. Key work includes Kaupthing Singer & Friedlander v CBRE, a case concerning negligent valuation.

XXIV Old Buildings is recommended for its ‘exceptional depth and breadth of expertise'. Recent instructions include the property-related case, Stephen and Leslie Plant v Orientfield Holdings, and Rawlinson & Hunter v Investec, regarding claims of gross negligence against former trustees.

The ‘approachable' team at 11 Stone Buildings has ‘a deep level of expertise and real strength in depth in professional negligence'.

One Crown Office Row’s ‘very knowledgeable' barristers provide ‘prompt and accurate responses'.

One Essex Court has a ‘strong track record in professional negligence work' with numerous members having particularly ‘high levels of experience'.

Essex Court Chambers provides ‘an excellent level of service' and ‘strong expertise'.

Littleton Chambers is ‘highly regarded for professional negligence work'.

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    - Druces

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