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The Legal 500 Hall of Fame Icon The Legal 500 Hall of Fame highlights individuals who have received constant praise by their clients for continued excellence. The Hall of Fame highlights, to clients, the law firm partners who are at the pinnacle of the profession. In Europe, Middle East and Africa, the criteria for entry is to have been recognised by The Legal 500 as one of the elite leading lawyers for seven consecutive years. These partners are highlighted below and throughout the editorial.
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Ireland > Public sector > Law firm and leading lawyer rankings

Editorial

Who Represents Who

Find out which law firms are representing which Public sector clients in Ireland using The Legal 500's new comprehensive database of law firm/client relationships. Instantly search over 925,000 relationships, including over 83,000 Fortune 500, 46,000 FTSE350 and 13,000 DAX 30 relationships globally. Access is free for in-house lawyers, and by subscription for law firms. For more information, contact david.burgess@legal500.com.

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A&L Goodbody has ‘a very good understanding of public sector work’ across a full range of areas including public procurement, state aid, sale of state assets, legislative drafting, and data protection. Highlights included Mark Rasdale and the ‘amazingAnna-Marie Curran advising CIE on the outsourcing of its data centre and data hosting requirements to Vodafone, and Curran and Eamonn Conlon assisting Transport Infrastructure Ireland with procurement and contractual issues concerning the project to upgrade the Dunkettle Interchange.

Arthur Cox has a long established reputation for public sector work and the firm acts for statutory bodies, government departments and state-sponsored bodies. Regulatory law is a particular strength and Gavin Woods and Joanelle O’Cleirigh are active for the Mental Health Commission and the Child and Family Agency. Alex McLean, Deborah Spence, and Danielle Conaghan are advising the Irish Forestry Board on one of the largest wind project pipelines under development in Ireland.

ByrneWallace’s extensive practice covers areas including health, tourism, communications, education, agriculture, and finance. As well as advising on a high volume of environmental health, clinical negligence and mental health claims for the HSE, the team also handled a range of matters for the National Tourism Development Authority, including Gillian O’Shaughnessy assisting with corporate compliance. Managing partner Catherine Guy is the main contact.

Mason Hayes & Curran is ‘a market leader’ for public sector work, and ‘extremely capable at conducting difficult and complex litigation’. In one highlight, Edward Gleeson is representing Garda Síochána Ombudsman Commission in the Fennelly Commission of Inquiry. In the energy space, Niall Michel handled numerous matters for the Commission for Regulation of Utilities including advising on the new integrated all-Ireland single electricity market. The ‘dependableCatherine Allen and Lisa Joyce are also recommended.

Practical experience feeds through into concise and on-point legal advice’ at McCann FitzGerald. Practice head Seán Barton, who is ‘unrivalled in his expertise in public law’, is advising the National Standards Authority Ireland on issues concerning the use of standard specification documents for commodities, processes and/or practices. Another key figure is public procurement specialist Jenny Mellerick, who ‘anticipates issues in advance’; Mellerick is assisting the National Development Finance Agency with the courts bundle PPP project.

William Fry is highly active for key client the Department of Finance, where work included Mark Talbot, David Fitzgibbon and Siobhan Carlin advising the Minister of Finance on the IPO of 25% of AIB. The team was also busy in areas such as regulatory enforcement and the modernisation of the national apprenticeship system. Jarleth Heneghan is advising DAA on the design and build of a new office park at Dublin Airport.

Matheson has a strong reputation for competition and regulatory matters in the communications and media sector; Michael Byrne handled various Freedom of Information Act 2014 compliance matters for RTÉ. In the energy space, Garret Farrelly is assisting Eirgrid and Soni with all aspects of the new wholesale electricity market arrangement for Ireland and Northern Ireland.

Philip Lee is highly active for clients such as the HSE and the Irish Planning Board in areas such as state aid, planning and environment and construction. Damien Young acted for the Data Protection Commissioner in the data transfer case against Facebook Ireland. Ann Henry joined Pinsent Masons LLP in 2018.

Beauchamps is particularly known for its work in the healthcare, education, charities and not-for-profit, and social housing sectors. The practice is led by EU specialist Dorit McCann and Mark Pery-Knox-Gore; the latter provides ‘sound and constructive advice’ to the likes of the National Disability Authority and the Charities Regulatory Authority. Edward Evans has ‘significant experience’ assisting with regulatory matters concerning health and social care services.

Eversheds Sutherland leads the way in public sector procurement work with Peter Curran active on numerous mandates for clients such as the Office of Government Procurement. The team is also strong for infrastructure work and in one example, Angelyn Rowan is acting for the National Development Finance Agency on the Grangegorman campus PPP. Litigator Norman Fitzgerald heads the team.

McDowell Purcell is noted for its ‘unrivalled knowledge and experience in relation to professional regulatory and disciplinary matters’; name partner JP McDowell, Eimear Burke and associate Stephen McLoughlin provide ‘reassuring professionalism and attention to detail’ on professional conduct inquiries to clients such as the Medical Council.

Holmes O'Malley Sexton regularly acts for Limerick public sector entities such as Limerick University and also has expertise in the regulatory sphere. Practice head Harry Fehily is acting for the Irish Greyhound Board in respect of the first successful prosecution under section 20 of the Welfare of Greyhounds Act 2011.

Ronan Daly Jermyn has ‘wide-ranging knowledge’ in areas such as procurement, clinical negligence and employment. Cork-based Diarmaid Gavin advised the University of Limerick on a sponsored research partnership agreement with Astellas Ireland. Other key figures are projects specialist Finola McCarthy (also in Cork), and Galway-based Imelda Tierney, who focuses on the defence of complex clinical negligence claims.

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Legal Developments in Ireland for Public sector

  • Equality before the Law

    Employment Equality legislation in Ireland is to be found in the Employment Equality Act 1998 as amended by the Equality Act 2004. This legislation is extremely detailed but in effect makes it unlawful for employers to discriminate against a person on the basis of gender, marital status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race, and membership of the traveller community. These are referred to as the “discriminatory grounds”.
    - Dillon Eustace

Legal Developments in Ireland

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • LANDWELL Bulletin: Managing in a Downturn

    As we are all well aware this is the most turbulent climate for business both nationally and internationally, that any of us have experienced. We have therefore focused this bulletin on areas where we believe we can help you take decisive steps to manage the issues that are required to get through the downturn and be properly prepared for the future.
  • The Companies (Amendment) Act 2009

    The Companies (Amendment) Act, 2009 (the “Act”) was signed into law on 12 July 2009. The Act provides for signifi cant changes to company law compliance and enforcement. It gives increased powers of search and seizure to the Offi ce of the Director of Corporate Enforcement (“ODCE”) and expands disclosure obligations with regard to transactions between a company and its directors (including specifi c changes for licensed banks). The Act also relaxes the requirement that at least one director of an Irish company must be resident in the State.
  • New Rules for Acquiring Transactions in the Financial Sector

    In line with EU-mandated requirements, Ireland has introduced new rules governing acquisitions, in whole or in part, of certain regulated financial institutions.
  • Irish Merger Control: Review of Key Developments in 2008

    A 47% Year-on-Year Drop in the Number of Deals Notified: Reflecting the global decline in merger activity, the number of deals notified to the Competition Authority fell to 38 in 2008, a 47% decrease from 2007, when 72 deals were notified, and a more than 60% decrease from the 2006 peak of 98 notified deals.
  • European Communities (Takeover Bids (Directive 2004/25/EC)) Regulations 2006

    The EU Takeovers Directive (2004/25/EC) (the “Takeovers Directive”) has been transposed into Irish law by the European Communities (Takeover Bids (Directive 2004/25/EC)) Regulations, 2006 (S. I. No. 255 of 2006) (the “Takeovers Regulations”). The stated aim of the Takeovers Directive is to strengthen the Single Market in financial services by facilitating cross-border restructuring and enhancing minority shareholder protection. Many of the provisions of the Directive are already contained in the existing Irish regime for the supervision of takeovers set out in the Irish Takeover Panel Act, 1997 (the “Act”), the Takeover Rules, 2001 (the “Rules”) and the Companies Acts 1963 – 2005, which will continue to apply. The Takeovers Regulations cater for those areas not already dealt with in the existing regime or areas of the regime that needed to be adjusted as a result of the requirements of the Takeovers Directive.
  • Establishing a Retail Fund in Ireland for sale in Japan Fund Structures and Features

    The issuing of securities of offshore funds for public sale into Japan is governed by a combination of the Securities and Exchange Law of Japan (the "SEL") which is enforced by the Japanese Ministry of Finance ("MOF"), the Law Concerning Investment Trust and Investment Company of Japan (the "Investment Funds Law") which is enforced by the Financial Services Agency of Japan ("FSA").Establishing a Retail Fund in Ireland for sale in Japan Fund Structures and Features
  • Equality before the Law

    Employment Equality legislation in Ireland is to be found in the Employment Equality Act 1998 as amended by the Equality Act 2004. This legislation is extremely detailed but in effect makes it unlawful for employers to discriminate against a person on the basis of gender, marital status, family status, sexual orientation, religion, age, disability, race, and membership of the traveller community. These are referred to as the “discriminatory grounds”.
  • Enforcement of Foreign Judgments in Ireland

    The enforcement of judgments between the EU member states is regulated by the Brussels I Regulation (44/2001, OJL 12/1, 16 January 2001) (“the Regulation”). On the 22nd December 2000, the European Council agreed the Regulation to replace the Brussels Convention on Jurisdiction and Enforcement of Judgments 1968 (“the Brussels Convention”). The purpose of the Regulation was to bring the law contained in the Brussels Convention into the main body of EC Law. The Regulation was implemented in Ireland by Statutory Instrument 52 of 2002, European Communities (Civil and Commercial Judgments) Regulations 2002, which came into force on the 1st March 2002.
  • E-Discovery

    Unlike the United States, which is leading the way in relation to e-discovery and where the disclosure of electronic data has become standard procedure, as of yet there is no standard protocol or practice direction issued in relation to e-discovery in Ireland. Despite this fact, Irish lawyers are beginning to appreciate the invaluable nature of electronic data which can be retrieved and used in commercial litigation.
  • Disclosure Requirements with respect to Company Particulars

    Directive 2003/58/EC amending Directive 68/151/EEC (the “First Disclosure Directive”) became effective on 1st April, 2007 having been transposed into Irish law by the European Communities (Companies) (Amendment) Regulations 2007 (S.I. No. 49 of 2007) (the “Regulations”).

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