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Hempsons

16TH FLOOR, CITY TOWER, PICCADILLY PLAZA, MANCHESTER, M1 4BT, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0161 228 0011
Fax:
Fax 0161 236 6734
DX:
14482 MANCHESTER-2
Email:
Web:
www.hempsons.co.uk

North West: Insurance

Clinical negligence: defendant
Clinical negligence: defendant - ranked: tier 1

Hempsons

Hempsons' large defendant clinical negligence department is known for handling complex and high value cases, with notable expertise in periodical payments and multi-party cases. The team is also renowned for its experience in handling claims relating to obstetric and surgical negligence as well as severe spinal cord injuries. Anne Ball leads the practice, which has seen a number of changes in recent months as the firm continues to develop its young talent. James Down, Jennie Chapman and Helen Claridge were all promoted to partner in July 2018, while Racquelle Morris retired.

Practice head(s):Anne Ball

Testimonials

'Hempsons have many years experience of working with public sector organisations - their ability to keep pace with the numerous changes has made them the go-to firm for clear advice on healthcare matters.'

'Their expertise and knowledge is unrivalled and they can always be relied on to have an understanding of the issues at hand.'

'They have real expertise and experience in dealing with clinical negligence claims.'

'Excellent service - Hempsons have an in-depth knowledge of NHS practices. Their advice is sound, well rounded and practical.'

 

Key Clients

NHS Resolution

MDU

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

Wrightington Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Work highlights

  • Successfully defended a number of NHS Trusts at liability-only trial in January 2018.
  • Represented defendant trust in clinical negligence claim involving bowel injury.
Leading individuals

Anne Ball - Hempsons

Kirsten Blohm - Hempsons

Next Generation Partners

Jennie Chapman - Hempsons

Rising stars

Hayley Neill - Hempsons

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North West: Public sector

Health
Health - ranked: tier 1

Hempsons

Hempsons is noted for its 'specialist knowledge of the healthcare sector' and handles a raft of instructions such as corporate, commercial, social care, projects, employment, negligence, regulatory, procurement and real estate mandates for public and private healthcare organisations, charities and social enterprises. The team also handles criminal and regulatory work, is instructed on complex procurement and outsourcing projects, and advises on data protection.  Anne Ball heads the team and jointly heads the healthcare litigation team with Kirsten Blohm. Recently promoted partner Oliver Crich is experienced in public procurement work.

Practice head(s):Anne Ball

Other key lawyers:Jane Donnison; Kirsten Blohm; Margaret Taylor; Paul Spencer; Chris Alderson; Michael Dulhanty; Andrew Daly; Oliver Crich; Helen Claridge; James Down; Jennie Chapman; Stephen Maratos

Key Clients

NHS Resolution

Medical Defence Union

Wrightington Wigan and Leigh NHS Foundation Trust

Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust

Mersey Care NHS Trust

NHS East Lancashire CCG

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust

Work highlights

  • Represented Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust and Blackpool Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) and successfully challenging Lancashire County Council in a procurement challenge for the provision of 0 – 19 services.  
  • Advised Wigan Borough CCG on the funding arrangements for the construction of a £4m healthcare centre to house two GP practices and other community amenities.
  • Advised Torbay and South Devon NHS Foundation Trust on all aspects of its successful and timely competitive dialogue procurement process to appoint a strategic estates partner.
  • Advised Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust on the development of the Wolfson Centre for Applied Health Research jointly with the Universities of Leeds and Bradford and part funded by the Welcome Foundation.
Leading individuals

Anne Ball - Hempsons

Next Generation Partners

Oliver Crich - Hempsons

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