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LOWER GROUND FLOOR, TEMPLE, LONDON, EC4Y 9AU, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7353 3102
Fax:
Fax 020 7353 0960
DX:
485 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Email:
Web:
www.3tg.co.uk

London Bar

Set overviews: England and Wales

3 TEMPLE GARDENS is a prominent set in the field of white collar and serious crime’ with its members appearing in some of the most high-profile cases. In recent news, Jeremy Wainwright QC took silk in 2019 and chambers was further strengthened by the arrival of three new tenants – Justin Hugheston-Roberts, Puneet Grewal, and Richard Reynolds – from 9 Bedford Row. Meanwhile, Alexander Williams, Rupert Hallowes , Sarah Read, and Simon Smith moved to 15 New Bridge Street with former deputy senior clerk Glenn Matthews, while Karlia Lykourgou joined Doughty Street Chambers. The quality of the clerking team led by ‘responsive approachable’ senior clerk Gary Brown is ‘second to none’. ‘Very commercially astute’, Brown ‘is responsible for chambers being propelled as a player in the international market and they regularly receive instructions on heavyweight fraud cases crossing borders’. Michael Cross is the deputy senior clerk and William McKimm is the first junior clerk. Offices in: London

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London Bar

Crime
Crime - Leading sets - ranked: tier 4

3 TEMPLE GARDENS

3 TEMPLE GARDENS, which primarily defends, has members who 'appear  in some of the most high-profile cases of the day'. Tim Forte, unled, represented a man charged with conspiracy to cause explosions likely to endanger life; thought to be only the second case involving actual or contemplated grenade use in England and Wales (the first being the murder of two Greater Manchester Police officers in 2012). Justin Hughston-Roberts, who joined from 9 Bedford Row, represented a gamekeeper who was charged with gross negligence manslaughter after a loaded shotgun stored in the back of his car went off, killing a passenger.

Leading Silks

Adam Davis QC - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSAn excellent jury silk.

Ranked: tier 3

Nadine Radford QC - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSShe prosecutes and defends in serious cases.

Ranked: tier 3
2019 Silks

Jeremy Wainwright QC - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSHe defends in a range of cases.

Ranked: tier 1
Leading Juniors

Christopher Bertham - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSHe defends, unled, in serious cases.

Ranked: tier 3

Flavia Kenyon - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSShe defends in violence cases.

Ranked: tier 3

Tim Forte - 3 TEMPLE GARDENSHe defends in organised crime cases.

Ranked: tier 3

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Fraud: crime
Leading Silks

Adam Davis QC - 3 Temple GardensHis sharp commercial sense stands him in very good stead to handle the intricacies of all manner of fraud cases.

Ranked: tier 3
Leading Juniors

Tim Forte - 3 Temple GardensA natural orator.

Ranked: tier 3

Cameron Scott - 3 Temple GardensHe has a great intellect, and always has a well thought-out strategy.

Ranked: tier 4

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Set overviews: England and Wales

3 TEMPLE GARDENS is a prominent set in the field of white collar and serious crime’ with its members appearing in some of the most high-profile cases. In recent news, Jeremy Wainwright QC took silk in 2019 and chambers was further strengthened by the arrival of three new tenants – Justin Hugheston-Roberts, Puneet Grewal, and Richard Reynolds – from 9 Bedford Row. Meanwhile, Alexander Williams, Rupert Hallowes , Sarah Read, and Simon Smith moved to 15 New Bridge Street with former deputy senior clerk Glenn Matthews, while Karlia Lykourgou joined Doughty Street Chambers. The quality of the clerking team led by ‘responsive approachable’ senior clerk Gary Brown is ‘second to none’. ‘Very commercially astute’, Brown ‘is responsible for chambers being propelled as a player in the international market and they regularly receive instructions on heavyweight fraud cases crossing borders’. Michael Cross is the deputy senior clerk and William McKimm is the first junior clerk. Offices in: London

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Further information on 3 Temple Gardens (3 Temple Gardens)

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London Bar

Offices in London

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