Abigail Bond > Chambers of Matthew White > Bristol, England > Lawyer Profile

Chambers of Matthew White
St John's Chambers
101 VICTORIA STREET
BRISTOL
BS1 6PU
England

Work Department

Family

Position

Abigail practises in all aspects of the law relating to children and is Head of the Children Law team. She has considerable experience of care proceedings in which she represents local authorities, parents and children. She handles a wide range of cases, including those involving allegations of inflicted injury and serious sexual abuse. She also undertakes complex private law work: high-conflict residence disputes, ‘intractable contact’ cases, and applications for leave to remove from the jurisdiction.

She is the author of several articles on family law matters and of the well-received Care Proceedings and Learning Disabled Parents: A Handbook for Family Lawyers (Jordans, 2014, 2nd edition). The Foreword, by Mrs Justice Pauffley, describes it as “erudite, concise and immensely readable”. The book arose out of Abigail’s experience in representing learning-disabled parents, where she strives to ensure that her clients are fairly and properly assessed, and given every opportunity to retain the care of their children.

In addition, Abigail represents parties in the Court of Protection, with an emphasis on health and welfare matters.

In 2019 Abigail was appointed as a Fee-paid Judge of the First–tier Tribunal (Health Education and Social Care Chamber), ticketed to the Mental Health Jurisdiction.

Career

Called 1999; formerly lecturer in Law, University of Leicester and University of East Anglia.

Memberships

Association of Lawyers for Children; Family Law Bar Association; Western Circuit.

Education

St John’s College, Oxford (BA Hons); University of East Anglia (LLM).

Lawyer Rankings

Regional Bar > Western Circuit > Family and children law

(Leading Juniors: Child Law (Public and Private))Ranked: Tier 1

Abigail BondSt John’s ChambersShe is always well-prepared and always calm. She is at her best when cross-examining vulnerable lay parties.’