Mr Paul Treble > Chambers of Richard Chapman KC > Manchester, England > Lawyer Profile

Chambers of Richard Chapman KC
18 St John Street Chambers
18-20 ST JOHN STREET
MANCHESTER
M3 4EA
England
Paul Treble photo

Position

A science graduate, Paul came to the bar via the private sector working with a number of FTSE 100 companies such as British Airways, Glaxo and Nat West. He was called to the bar in 1994 and since then has developed an extensive practise both home and abroad. After a spell as a partner in a local firm of solicitors, he re-joined the bar and picked his practice up where he left off.

Considering his love of travel, he has been fortunate to have practised both home and abroad, doing several high profile cases in the Falkland Islands.

He is efficient and personable and easy to work with, a professional but one who hasn’t forgotten that common touch. He has an eye for detail but knows what the key issue in his case is and what the tribunal wants to hear.

As an experienced and able advocate, Paul has prosecuted and defended some of the most serious cases on circuit. His current practice is detailed below. A trademark of his practice though is his personal touch with his clients (or complainants, if prosecuting). He is well known for his sensitivity, communication skills and clarity with even the most difficult of clients. His policy is that it is important that the advocate doesn’t forget that one is dealing with an individual; an individual with a family and he is at pains to answers concerns and worries of those family members (with client permission).

Recently he has carved a niche in cases involving vulnerable clients and complainants and was the one of the first counsel to conduct a trial under the vulnerable witness procedure (“section 28” cases). He now regularly conducts “section 28” hearings and trials and is well experienced in matters involving an intermediary. Paul is well suited to such cases, due to his understanding and experience of the needs of such individuals.

Paul also practices in the Coroners’ Court. His scientific background has helped enormously with him adapting to the inquisitorial system and in particular with the wealth of scientific evidence in such cases.

He is mindful of the ramifications of a rule 43 order and has been involved in identifying best practice and how procedures can be improved.