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Chambers of Rachel Sleeman

FIVE PAPER BUILDINGS, TEMPLE, LONDON, EC4Y 7HB, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7815 3200
Fax:
Fax 020 7815 3201
DX:
415 LONDON CHANCERY LANE
Email:
Web:
www.fivepaper.com

London Bar

Commercial litigation
Leading Juniors

Simon Mills - Five PaperCommercially astute, technically brilliant, and a fighter.

Ranked: tier 4

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Employment
Leading Juniors

Jake Davies - Five PaperA thorough, robust and tenacious approach to tricky cases as well as very strong advocacy.

Ranked: tier 4

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Health and safety
Leading Juniors

Ian Wright - Five PaperA compelling and persuasive advocate who remains calm under fire.

Ranked: tier 2

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Immigration (including business immigration)
Leading Juniors

Satinder Gill - Five PaperHe is a first port of call on all complex and sensitive immigration questions.

Ranked: tier 3

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Insolvency
Leading Juniors

Morwenna Macro - Five PaperShe is really able to see the wood from the trees and provide innovative and pragmatic solutions.

Ranked: tier 5

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Property litigation
Leading Silks

Nicholas Grundy QC - Five PaperA barrister of superb quality with a legal knowledge which is second to none.

Ranked: tier 5
Leading Juniors

Ben Maltz - Five PaperProvides a conscientious, accessible approach, with admirable advocacy skills.

Ranked: tier 5

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Social housing
Social housing - Leading sets - ranked: tier 2

Five Paper

Five Paper has 'a good spread across senior and junior levels' in the social housing arena. One referee commented that it is 'second to none in terms of its knowledge and experience of the sector'. Also notable is that 'the clerks are very personable and diligent; led well by David Portch'. The set is noted for its strengths in acting for landlords, local authorities and social housing organisations. It has featured in many high-profile and landmark cases; in one example, Nicholas Grundy QC was the lead counsel to the London Borough of Brent in Alibkhiet v LB Brent, where the Court of Appeal held there was no obligation to tell applicants of available housing closer to Brent, and that the local authority's allocation policy and procurement of accommodation were lawful. Another instruction saw Grundy QC serve as the lead counsel for the local authority in XPQ v The London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham; this case addressed the housing duties of local authorities to human trafficking victims. Tina Conlan represented the local authority at the Court of Appeal in Kannan v LB Newham, which involved a homelessness statutory appeal on the suitability of accommodation.

Leading Silks

Nicholas Grundy QC - Five PaperHe has an amazing ability to appear relaxed in even the most difficult cases and puts clients at their ease

Ranked: tier 2
Leading Juniors

Terry Gallivan - Five PaperHas an encyclopaedic knowledge of housing law and is always a safe pair of hands

Ranked: tier 1

Stephen Evans - Five PaperKnown for advising local authority and registered provider landlords on housing matters, including dilapidations claims and cases involving disability discrimination/Equality Act issues

Ranked: tier 2

Sara Beecham - Five PaperIs very personable and is very good at explaining complex issues to the lay client

Ranked: tier 3

Tina Conlan - Five PaperSought out for advice on homelessness appeals, housing matters involving anti-social behaviour and disrepair claims

Ranked: tier 3

Victoria Osler - Five PaperHer strength is that she will not easily give up, has a lot of energy and will fight her client’s corner while she remains standing

Ranked: tier 3

Angela Hall - Five PaperAn excellent advocate, who is confident and compelling on her feet

Ranked: tier 4

Ben Maltz - Five PaperHe assists local authorities and registered providers with a wide range of housing matters. Tenancy fraud cases are a notable area of specialism

Ranked: tier 4

Josephine Henderson - Five PaperShe has more than 20 years of housing law experience

Ranked: tier 4

Jane Hodgson - Five PaperShe is knowledgeable about security of tenure and succession rights, disrepair and unlawful eviction, among other areas

Ranked: tier 4

Sam Phillips - Five PaperA truly formidable advocate. Whether he is in the High Court, Court of Appeal or in the County Court, he is eloquent and nimble on his feet and devastating in cross-examination

Ranked: tier 4

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Further information on Five Paper (Chambers of Rachel Sleeman)

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