Leila Gaskin > Chambers of Nicholas Rhodes QC and Neil Hawes QC > London, England > Lawyer Profile

Chambers of Nicholas Rhodes QC and Neil Hawes QC
Charter Chambers
33 JOHN STREET
LONDON
WC1N 2AT
England

Work Department

Prosecution and defence in large-scale fraud and money laundering.

Position

Notable cases include: R v Richard Pollet & ors, large SFO prosecution of five defendants alleged to have defrauded individuals of £10m over the period of a year. They set up and operated a Ponzi scheme in Mallorca. R v Kamal, Ahmed, Khan, Osman and Malik, a multi-million pound money laundering enterprise involving the transfer of criminal funds picked up from individuals in the north of England and delivered to London ultimately to a money service business in Tooting to be transferred through a series of complicated inter-account transfers and on to businesses in Asia and the Far East. R v Buckharee, Recchia & five others, the first prosecution brought by the Insurance Fraud Enforcement Department (IFED). Leila represented the second defendant who was charged with setting up and operating ghost broking websites – fraudulent websites set up offering cheap car insurance and in return providing insurance documents purporting to be legitimate. The money obtained from innocent customers, hundreds and thousands of pounds, was laundered through various bank accounts.

Career

Qualified 2000; Middle Temple.

Memberships

CBA; SE Circuit.

Education

University College, Durham (LLB, Dunelm).

Lawyer Rankings

London Bar > Fraud: crime

Within: Leading Juniors -

Leila Gaskin



Charter Chambers



An extremely articulate and elegant advocate.

London Bar > Crime

Within: Leading Juniors -

Leila Gaskin



Charter Chambers



A charming practitioner unafraid to stand up for what is right.

Defence-focused set Charter Chambers covers the gamut of criminal work. Henry Grunwald QC represented a member of drill group Moscow17, who was acquitted of murder after a teenager was fatally stabbed in Peckham. Leila Gaskin represented the appellant in R v Chudasama, in which the Court of Appeal reduced three concurrent sentences for causing death by dangerous driving, which were initially calculated by adding three lengths together as if they were to be imposed consecutively and then making deductions for personal mitigation and guilty pleas.