Alex Gask > Doughty Street Chambers > London, England > Lawyer Profile

Doughty Street Chambers
53-54 DOUGHTY STREET
LONDON
WC1N 2LS
England

Work Department

Human rights.

Position

Alex is a specialist in the protection of civil liberties and human rights.

His practice encompasses both private and public law, with Alex as comfortable pursuing civil actions against the police as he is arguing judicial review claims turning on complex points of law. He has an in depth knowledge of police and prison law and has appeared in numerous inquests on behalf of bereaved families.

Alex has represented clients at all levels, from parole board hearings and tribunals to applications before the European Court of Human Rights.

Alex is a contributing author to Halsbury’s Laws of England: Rights and Freedoms (Butterworths, 2013), and to the 4th to 6th editions of Supperstone, Goudie & Walker: Judicial Review (Lexis Nexis). He is currently working on a police actions text book.

Career

Called: 2008, Middle Temple. Alex began his career as a trainee solicitor at the international law firm Linklaters. However, on qualification he realised that his interests lay elsewhere and became a solicitor and legal officer at the human rights organisation Liberty. During his 5 years at Liberty, Alex led on much of the organisation’s most significant and high profile litigation – particularly through judicial review. He worked on a wide range of issues including the right to protest, sex and sexuality discrimination, breach of privacy by police & local authorities, excessive police powers and the right to effective investigation into inhuman & degrading treatment. Alex also provided training on human rights to solicitors and advisers throughout the UK. Alex took up a new challenge as a barrister in 2008, completing pupillage and becoming a tenant at Doughty St Chambers.

Memberships

Liberty

Human Rights Lawyers Association (HRLA)

Administrative Law Bar Association (ALBA)

Education

Colchester Royal Grammar School; St John’s College, Oxford (1999, Jurisprudence, 2:1).