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Eversheds Sutherland

ONE EARLSFORT CENTRE, EARLSFORT TERRACE, DUBLIN 2, IRELAND
Tel:
Work +353 1 664 4200
Fax:
Fax +353 1 664 4300
Email:
Web:
www.eversheds-sutherland.ie

Dermot McEvoy

Tel:
Work +353 1 6644 238
Email:
Eversheds Sutherland

Work Department

Dermot is a Partner in Dispute Resolution & Litigation

"A 'very solid and commercial' dispute resolution practitioner, who is 'a very safe pair of hands' on large-scale, complex disputes, particularly on behalf of major banks and property developers." -Chambers Global 2016

"really knows his stuff and is well respected," according to sources, who agree he is "a great commercial litigator and a really honourable sort of guy." - Chambers Europe 2014

“efficient, on the ball and great to deal with,” while impressed peers say “he is top of our referrals list.” - Chambers Global 2013

“client-focused and commercial lawyer who is always thinking ahead.” - Chambers Europe 2012

 

Dermot is an experienced and savvy commercial litigator, an accredited mediator, and an experienced practitioner in arbitration. He increasingly focuses on advising clients on financial service disputes, professional indemnity issues and general commercial disputes.

Dermot also has a strong practice in the specialist areas of construction litigation (including design team professional indemnity claims). Primarily within this sphere Dermot has developed a strong practice of arbitration. He represents financial institutions and corporate clients, together with various construction professionals in a wide range of contentious disputes. Dermot is also an experienced and respected commercial mediator and brings these skills to bear in assisting clients resolve difficult and protracted commercial disputes which are in the courts and before arbitrators.

Dermot's recent experience includes:

  • Advising Bank of Ireland in a long running case relating to allegations of negligence and breach of contract; following a recent Supreme Court appeal the case has been re-activated and will proceed to trail under the direction of the President of the High Court (adopting commercial court rules) notwithstanding that it has been litigated for over 23 years.
  • Advising Bank of Scotland on numerous enforcement matters before the Commercial Court and elsewhere.
  • Acting in a waste management dispute for lead contractor before the Commercial Court.
  • Acting for numerous design professionals in claims for professional negligence and breach of contract before the Commercial Court and in arbitrations.
  • Successfully resolving shareholders disputes arising from claims of oppression of minority shareholders, by way of mediated settlements, where both proceedings had been admitted into the Commercial list of the High court.

To view the Ireland chapter in the sixth edition of The International Arbitration Review click here.

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Position

Partner


Ireland

Construction

Within: Construction

Eversheds Sutherland impresses with major instructions in the contentious and non-contentious space. Dermot McEvoy’s varied caseload included defending Earlsfort Centre Developments in breach of contract proceedings over an alleged failure to make a top-up payment relating to an agreement entered into following the acquisition of a residential development site in Raheny, County Dublin. Angelyn Rowan is acting for Ardale Property Group on several residential and commercial developments, and is also advising Nama-appointed receiver Duff & Phelps on work being carried out on an existing large apartment complex.

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Dispute resolution

Within: Dispute resolution

'Unstinting attention to detail sets the team apart' at Eversheds Sutherland; it focuses on professional negligence and public sector litigation in particular. Norman Fitzgerald and Stephen Barry are defending EY against an €80m auditors professional negligence claim stemming from the financial crisis. Dermot McEvoy specialises in construction and property disputes; Aisling Gannon and Jim Trueick have healthcare and insurance expertise; and Pamela O’Neill is noted for regulatory work.

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