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Wynn Williams

LEVEL 1, AIG BULDING, 41 SHORTLAND STREET, AUCKLAND 1010, NEW ZEALAND
Tel:
Work +64 3 379 7622
Fax:
Fax +64 9 300 2609
Email:
Web:
www.wynnwilliams.co.nz
Auckland, Christchurch

The firm: Wynn Williams is a full service, national law firm with a team of 95+ lawyers and support staff across offices in Christchurch and Auckland, New Zealand.   We provide advice to companies, private individuals and rural clients - as well as local authorities, and overseas investors.  The firm has a global outlook and services clients from all over the world. To support this it has trusted relationships with international law firms to enable the firm to provide a seamless global service to its clients.

Wynn Williams is committed to listening to its clients, leading in its legal work to help clients achieve their goals, and growing its client relationships.

The firm is proud to be one of New Zealand's oldest law firms - established in 1859. Its long history is a testament to the adaptability, strength and integrity of the firm and its lawyers. Throughout the years, the firm has led New Zealand in the legal profession, providing excellent legal services to its large and varied client base.

Areas of practice: Litigation and dispute resolution: Wynn Williams has one of the strongest dispute resolution teams in the country, with a New Zealand-wide reputation for delivering successful results with integrity and responsibility. If you are faced with a dispute, either in your business or personal life, the team can apply its commercial insight and unrivalled experience to your case. The firm provides expertise in all areas of dispute resolution: commercial and contractual disputes; real estate and leases; contentious trusts and estates; relationship property; care of children and family; employment and health and safety; arbitration; insolvency and credit recovery; professional and product liability; judicial review and public law; intellectual property; Maori; construction.

Insurance: Wynn Williams has for some time been an industry leader in the specialised field of insurance law. The firm's hallmark is product knowledge. It has been involved in a number of policy revision and re-drafting programmes and commonly advises on coverage questions for all forms of property and liability lines, and reinsurance treaties. The team is regularly instructed to act in: disputes where the insurer has accepted liability and is indemnifying the insured; and disputes where the insurer's liability is disputed over questions of policy interpretation, scope of coverage and application of exclusions or endorsements arise.

Corporate: the team advises a broad range of corporate clients, banks, financial institutions, boards and individual directors on their corporate governance-related matters which affect them on an ongoing basis. The team also advises on all aspects of their ongoing corporate affairs including company law, corporate governance, disputes with or between shareholders, directors' duties and compliance. The team can assist with the following: capital raising; mergers and acquisitions; start-ups; and venture capital.

Resource management and environmental law: the team is renowned for managing complex projects, from inception through to appeals. It can assist where legislation or planning documents impact on what you can or cannot do with your land, business, home or resources. The team takes a "whole of client" approach to providing advice, with a particular emphasis on finding practical solutions to achieve identified outcomes. It can assist with the following: planning and consents; property requirements; aquaculture and fisheries; mining, quarrying and aggregate; and air quality.

Commercial property: the commercial property team - which includes in-house resource management specialists - is sought after by individuals, businesses, and large private and public institutions. The team has involvement in all types of commercial property projects; from retail centres and mixed use developments, to large institutional commercial property portfolios and it can assist with the following: industrial property; office property; property development; and retail property.

Restructuring and insolvency: Wynn Williams provides advice to significant national clients in this field. The firm has litigated insolvency cases at the highest levels, including the Privy Council. The team works with large lenders and the Public Trust to advise on and enforce their security position. It also provides advice in relation to complex issues in liquidation and receivership. The team regularly advises on: liquidations and receiverships; the security position of lenders; debt recovery; enforcement of personal property securities; Securities Act and Companies Office investigations.

  • Number of lawyers: 66
  • at this office: 23
  • Languages
  • English
  • Member
  • State Capital Group

Above material supplied by Wynn Williams.

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