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Lewis Silkin LLP

Living Wage
5 CHANCERY LANE, CLIFFORD'S INN, LONDON, EC4A 1BL, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7074 8000
Fax:
Fax 020 7864 1200
DX:
182 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Email:
Web:
www.lewissilkin.com

Lewis Silkin is a UK top-100 commercial law firm with offices in London, Oxford, Cardiff, Dublin and Hong Kong. The firm is recognised by clients and industry alike as being distinct: for its deep understanding, insight and advice to creative, innovative and brand-focused businesses; for its market-leading international practice in employment, immigration and reward; and for delivering pragmatic, commercial advice in a refreshingly human way.

The firm: With 60 partners and more than 400 staff, the firm is structured around two key divisions.  In employment, immigration and reward it is consistently top-ranked. With over 100 lawyers, Lewis Silkin's employment and immigration team offers an unrivalled service supporting clients, including many of the world's leading businesses, on their HR, employment and immigration law needs domestically and internationally. The creators, makers and innovators team is made up of leading advisers for creative, innovative and brand-focused businesses, offering deep understanding of the industry sectors in which clients operate combined with real expertise across a wide range of legal services. From start-ups to multinationals, the firm's comprehensive and commercially focused advice helps clients succeed in an increasingly complex and converged international marketplace, whether they receive advice from both, or just one division.

Lewis Silkin is renowned for offering high-quality legal advice paired with a personal touch and individual flair, and for being the 'lawyers' lawyers'. Boasting top-notch credentials in a number of areas, the firm is ranked number one in both employment law and IP, brands and trade marks in the UK. It also has a leading reputation in areas such as advertising, marketing, media and entertainment, among many others.

Feedback consistently shows that clients particularly value the firm's cost-effectiveness, its personalised approach to the needs of their businesses, and distinctive approach to sharing legal updates, know-how and training (details on www.lewissilkin.com).

The firm is also regarded as an employer of choice, having been consistently ranked in The Sunday Times' '100 Best Companies to Work For' for nine years running and maintaining an 'outstanding' two-star accreditation from 'Best Companies'. It is also an accredited living wage employer, and has previously won an award for 'Best Social Mobility Programme' at the Awards for Management Excellence by the Managing Partners' Forum.

The firm's reach also extends worldwide through its Hong Kong office and membership of two leading global legal networks: Ius Laboris, which focuses on employment law; and the Global Advertising Lawyers Alliance (GALA) which deals with advertising and marketing law.

Types of work undertaken: The creators, makers and innovaters division of Lewis Silkin offers the full spectrum of legal services to support creative clients in a complex and converging international marketplace. Its 11 different legal practice groups and array of non-legal business service offerings deliver practical advice and real commercial insight in a refreshing and straight-forward manner. From incorporating a new business, renewing a lease, registering a design, and protecting data or intellectual property, to expanding a business internationally, hiring new teams or handling major commercial disputes, Lewis Silkin can provide the focus and commercial expertise needed.

The employment, immigration and reward division of the firm focuses on employment, reward and immigration issues, supporting many of the world's leading businesses with their HR and employment law needs in the UK and around the world.

Across these two areas the firm has unmatched expertise and capability within eight key industry sectors: advertising and marketing; manufacturing and engineering; media and entertainment; retail, fashion and hospitality; sports business; technology; financial services; and professional services.

  • Number of partners: 60
  • Breakdown of work %
  • ‚Ä©
  • Employment/immigration/tax, rewards and incentives: 42
  • Brands and intellectual property/commercial/data and privacy/trade mark and portfolio management : 23
  • Corporate/partnership: 14
  • Real estate: 11
  • Dispute resolution: 10

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Above material supplied by Lewis Silkin LLP.

Legal Developments by:
Lewis Silkin LLP

  • Negotiating the minefield of administrative decisions

    There are many situations where decisions are made by organisations such as local authorities (during the tendering process, the grant of contracts or planning decisions, for example) or professional or disciplinary bodies where a party may wish to challenge the outcome. A party with an interest in a decision may feel aggrieved by the outcome due to what appears to be a conflict of interest by those making the decision, or the appearance of bias. This may have serious consequences for in-house lawyers acting for organisations subject to such decisions, and therefore this briefing is intended to provide a general overview of the areas to consider. Challenging judicial or quasi-judicial decisions where there is a conflict of interest was considered by James Levy in a previous briefing (IHL146, p37-40).
    - Lewis Silkin LLP

Legal Developments in the UK

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