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Kennedys

5TH FLOOR, 35 NEWHALL STREET, BIRMINGHAM, B3 3PU, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0121 214 8000
Fax:
Fax 0121 214 8001
DX:
13043 BIRMINGHAM
Web:
www.kennedyslaw.com
Auckland, Austin, Bangkok, Basking Ridge, Belfast, Birmingham and 31 more

DIVERSITY AT KENNEDYS

As a growing global law firm, attracting and retaining talent from a variety of different backgrounds has allowed us to develop a distinct culture that we are proud of.

We are committed to promoting equality and diversity at Kennedys. Our principles of non-discrimination and equality of opportunity apply not only to our employees, but also to the way we treat our visitors, clients, customers and suppliers.

Demonstrating our commitment, we were proud to be the global gold-level partners of the Dive In festival for the first time in 2018. Dive In is a multi-award winning festival for diversity and inclusion in insurance run by Inclusion@Lloyd’s, a cross market collaboration of C-suite executives and industry associations driving the strategic push for greater diversity in the Lloyd’s market.

Our equality and diversity policy

We support our workplace and clients by following our equality and diversity policy. Our policy covers:

  • Discrimination
  • Recruitment and selection
  • Training and promotion
  • Termination of employment
  • Treating outside parties
  • Monitoring
  • Disabled employees.

Everyone at Kennedys has a duty to act in accordance with our equality and diversity policy. They must treat others with dignity at all times, and not discriminate against or harass job applicants or other employees regardless of their status.

Discrimination

Discrimination is prohibited on the basis of age, disability, gender reassignment, marital or civil partner status, pregnancy or maternity, race, colour, nationality, ethnic or national origin, religion or belief, sex or sexual orientation.

Recruitment and selection

Job applicants do not suffer discrimination, job selection criteria are regularly reviewed to ensure they are relevant to the job, and short listing of applicants is completed by more than one person.

Training and promotion

Training needs are identified through regular reviews. All promotion decisions will be made on the basis of merit.

Termination of employment

Any disciplinary procedures and penalties are applied without discrimination and redundancy criterion and procedures are fair and objective.

Treating outside parties

Kennedys is free to accept instruction from any particular client and refusal to act will not be based on any protected characteristics. Lawyers will be instructed based on their skills, experience and ability.

Monitoring

Workforce composition is monitored at all levels to ensure equality of opportunity across the firm. Where appropriate, steps will be taken to identify and remove unjustified barriers.

Disabled employees

Those with a disability will be treated fairly and reasonable adjustments to the workplace, or job content, will be made to ensure that an employee with a disability is not disadvantaged.

Legal Developments in the UK

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Court of Justice rules on source of income for Derivative Residence applications

    On 2 October 2019, the Court of Justice delivered its judgment in Bajratari v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Directive 2004/38/EC) Case C-93/18 which concerns Chen applications and the source of funds for self-sufficiency. 
  • End of the ‘centre of life test’ in Surinder Singh cases?

    In the recent case of  ZA (Reg 9. EEA Regs; abuse of rights) Afghanistan   [2019] UKUT 281 (IAC ), the Upper Tribunal found that there is no basis in EU law for the centre of life test, as set out in Regulation 9(3)(a) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (the “Regulations”). It further found that it is not to be applied when Judges assess  Surinder Singh  cases that appear before them.
  • Terms of employment as a sole representative

    In this article we examine the working arrangements of sole representatives, looking at the terms and conditions of employment that the Home Office will expect a sole representative to have in order to qualify as a representative of an overseas business.  
  • Can Sole Representatives Be Shareholders?

    The Immigration Rules require that an applicant for a  sole representative visa  is not “a  majority shareholder in the overseas business”.
  • Immigration Skills Charge - A Guide for Employers

    As a Sponsor, you may be required to pay the Immigration Skills Charge (ISC) each time you sponsor a migrant in the  Tier 2 General  or  Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) Long-term Staff  subcategory.
  • 5 FAQS about paragraph 320(11)

    In applications for entry clearance where the applicant has a negative immigration history in the UK, the application may be refused under the general grounds for refusal, which are found in part 9 of the Immigration Rules. Where an applicant has  ‘previously contrived in a significant way to frustrate the intentions of the Immigration Rules’,  the application could be refused under paragraph 320(11). In this post we look at five frequently asked questions about paragraph 320(11). 
  • Multiple nationality and multiple citizenship (including dual nationality and dual citizenship)

    British nationality law permits multiple nationality and multiple citizenship, including dual nationality and dual citizenship.
  • Applying for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the Exceptional Talent or Promise Category

    The  Exceptional Talent  and Exceptional Promise categories are for individuals who are recognised leaders or emerging leaders in their field of expertise. There are a number of endorsing bodies for lots of different fields of work, including  artists and musicians ,  architects ,  digital experts ,  scientists  and  academics . While there isn’t an endorsing body for every expert, the growing list means that many individuals could enjoy the flexibility that this category has to offer. 
  • PARALLEL PROCEEDINGS – CIVIL AND CRIMINAL

    Syedur Rahmanconsiders the factors that determine when civil proceedings can go ahead before,or at the same time as, criminal proceedings relating to the same circumstances.
  • Rights of appeal after the Immigration Act 2014

    The Immigration Act 2014 (“the 2014 Act”) reduced the circumstances in which the refusal of an immigration application will give rise to a right of appeal. The  explanatory notes  to the 2014 Act state that the Act was intended to restructure rights of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal. Previously, a right of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal existed against any of the 14 different immigration decisions listed in s.82 of the  Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002  (“the 2002 Act”). As explained below, whether or not the refusal of an immigration application currently generates a right of appeal depends on the subject matter of the application rather than its categorisation.