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Freeths LLP

CUMBERLAND COURT, 80 MOUNT STREET, NOTTINGHAM, NG1 6HH, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0115 936 9369
Fax:
Fax 0115 859 9600
DX:
10039 NOTTINGHAM
Email:
Web:
www.freeths.co.uk

Freeths is a national law firm with a great reputation for delivering high-quality advice and results for its clients. Clients talk about trusting the Freeths team to do the right thing, and like their strong ethics, integrity and entrepreneurial spirit.

The firm: With 12 offices in the UK the firm has excellent geographic reach and connectivity, with plans in place to further expand to enhance its national reach. This growth firmly establishes Freeths as one of the leading national law firms in the UK. A snapshot of clients includes: Aldi national supermarket, RBS, Tarmac, BDW Group, Ladbrokes Coral, Travis Perkins, Fresenius Medical Care, Santander, Capita, Bellway Homes Limited, Whitbread Group LPC, Centre Parcs, Poundland, Nottingham University and Experian.

Freeths has won a host of regional and national accolades in recent years, including Best Companies for 2017, and is ranked 50th in the Sunday Times Top 100 Best Companies to Work For 2017. It also won 'Best Firm 2015' in the UK Diversity Legal Awards. The Legal 500's UK rankings also put Freeths as a top-tier firm in no less than 21 categories, recommending 97 lawyers, of which 17 are listed as elite leading lawyers, and 63 partners are recognised by Chambers UK as leaders in their field. Furthermore, the litigation and corporate teams were finalists in The Legal 500 UK Awards for team of the year 2017. Freeths has also been awarded silver standard in Investors in People and Legal Technology Awards and nominations. The firm is committed to the regional communities in which it is based and actively supports a number of causes, both nationally and regionally.

The firm's approach is rooted in knowing and understanding its clients and building value. Freeths' core values ensure it is committed to: delivering results by taking ownership of the situation in order to provide practical and often bespoke solutions; building trust and long-term relationships, working closely with clients and sharing risk when appropriate; and thinking differently, with the firm offering real insight and innovative solutions to legal and commercial issues, and to the way in which these are delivered to help its clients get a step ahead.

Clients are particularly impressed with its efforts to partner closely to reduce their legal spend by analysing the root cause and then up-skilling the client's team.

Types of work undertaken: The firm works with major international and UK corporations, FTSE/AIM companies, regional businesses, institutions, public bodies and high-net-worth individuals. It works across all areas of practice, including corporate, commercial, HR, pensions, property (developers, institutional lenders, investors, housing associations, and commercial landlords and tenants), planning, environmental, tax, dispute resolution, intellectual property, EC law and corporate defence.

Freeths' private client team has an excellent reputation for advising individuals on every aspect of their life, from wealth generation and preservation through to acquisitions and disposals of property, family and childcare matters, elderly parents, injury and clinical negligence, and future planning (wills and probate).

Key sector specialisms include stand-out experience in the drinks and hospitality sector, retail, food, franchise, transport, renewable energy, property, healthcare and public sector.

The private client team at Freeths' Oxford office is well known in agriculture, bloodstock and rural affairs, as well as the charities sector.

Other offices:  Sheffield, Stoke-on-Trent, Liverpool, Nottingham, Derby, Birmingham, London, Manchester, Oxford, Leicester, Leeds, Milton Keynes.

  • Number of UK partners: 150
  • Number of other UK fee-earners: 463

Above material supplied by Freeths LLP.

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