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Freeths LLP

CHURCHILL HOUSE, REGENT ROAD, STOKE ON TRENT, ST1 3RQ, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 01782 202020
DX:
20727 HANLEY
Email:
Web:
www.freeths.co.uk

West Midlands: Corporate and commercial

Corporate and commercial: Birmingham
Corporate and commercial: Birmingham - ranked: tier 3

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP's Birmingham-based practice handles a range of deals, many of which feature cross-border elements and private equity involvement. Tom Brown  advised the sellers of BWB, including Catapault Ventures, on the company’s sale to CAF. Ateeq Ahmed advised Phoenix Ventures (a part of the Sri Lankan company Brandix) on its purchase of Quantum Clothing Group, and separately advised Tarmac Trading on buying JB Riney. Lee Clifford  advised Away Resorts, a subsidiary of Lloyds Development Capital, on its purchase of Sandy Balls Estates, and, among other management buyout deals, the management of Clamason Industries on a deal backed by Connection Capital and Santander.

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West Midlands: Dispute resolution

Commercial litigation: Birmingham
Commercial litigation: Birmingham - ranked: tier 4

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP represents a mixture of individuals, SMEs and better-known corporate in a range of litigation. Richard Coates has a diverse practice, including warranties disputes, civil fraud cases involving company leadership. Louse Wilson is another partner of note – her work also includes cases with corporate governance challenges, and disputes concerning supply of goods. Associate James Modley  joined from Shoosmiths LLP.

Next generation lawyers

Richard Coates - Freeths LLP

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Commercial litigation: elsewhere in the West Midlands
Commercial litigation: elsewhere in the West Midlands - ranked: tier 3

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP in Stoke on Trent ‘provides very good service, which is due to its long-standing relationships developed over time – the client has a good understanding of clients’ businesses and ethics’. Stephen Hadley , who heads the practice, handles work including M&A litigation and several disputes over the ownership of property. In one highlight, he advised Baker Tilly as trustees in one of three brothers party to a partnership dispute owning several properties in multiple countries, against a backdrop of alleged conveyancing fraud and impersonation. Natural resources are an area of expertise – the team advises Tarmac on mineral regulation matters.

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West Midlands: Finance

Banking and finance
Banking and finance - ranked: tier 3

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP is ‘a firm clients want to work with’ with a ‘strong team of associates’. James Dyson is ‘always contactable and gives clear and concise advice’ – he advised Clydesdale Bank on term loan, development finance and invoice discounting facilities totaling £11m to Penso Group, and several term loan and working capital facilities to Allumette. Borrower-side work included advising Away Resorts Group on a refinancing provided by Permira Debt Managers simultaneous to the client’s purchase of another resort. Other clients include Frontier Development Capital, and Leumi ABL, which it advised on an acquisition facility lent to Go Interiors for the purchase of FBF.

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West Midlands: Human resources

Employment
Employment - ranked: tier 5

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP  has employment experts in its Birmingham and Stoke offices, representing clients such as ALDI Stores ,National Express and Birmingham Metropolitan College. Rebecca Sawbridge  leads the Birmingham office and recently advised Paul Smith on employee grievances and exits.  Peter Gavin  heads the Stoke team and defended Goodlife Foods against a complex unfair dismissal claim from a former employee.  He also assisted Preston Innovations with the dismissal of several employees on the grounds of suspected theft.

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Immigration

Freeths LLP  business immigration practice has experience in sponsor licence applications, outsourced license management, compliance audits and right to work support. John Craig is a key contact.

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West Midlands: Insurance

Professional negligence
Professional negligence - ranked: tier 4

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP  is a 'strong broad practice', acting for professionals in legal services, financial services  and construction. Practice head Richard Coates has 'a great attitude' and 'an amazing presence when dealing with other aggressive firms'. Also recommended is Louise Wilson , who is 'a very good instructing solicitor' and a 'sensible', 'considerate', and  'an independent-thinking team player'.

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West Midlands: Projects, energy and natural resources

Energy
Energy - ranked: tier 3

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP is ‘a huge asset to clients’ in the solar and wind renewables spaces. Catherine Burke advises Voltalia UK on various transactions, including a project in Tanzania and an EPC contract for one of the final renewables obligation scheme-backed solar farms in the UK. Burke and ‘faultless professionalJason Richards, a new hire from Blake Morgan LLP, advised Metka GN on EPC contracts for a range of solar projects in the UK and beyond. Other clients include Re Projects Development and Clean Earth Energy Wind Investments.

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Project finance and PFI
Project finance and PFI - ranked: tier 1

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLPvery capable, responsive and adaptable lawyers’ advise on a range of PFI structures, acting for a wide range of investors. James Larmour’s practice includes various education transactions – he advised Dalmore Capital on purchasing Sewell’s interests in the Hull Building Schools for the Future scheme, and INPP on purchasing Carillion’s stake in the Wolverhampton BSF. In the health space, he also advises Care UK.

Leading individuals

James Larmour - Freeths LLP

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West Midlands: Public sector

Local government
Local government - ranked: tier 3

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP is led by local government law specialist Nathan Holden who regularly advises on real estate and commercial matters,  and recently worked with Leicester City Council on the redevelopment of its Waterside site. Private equity and corporate specialist Lee Clifford conducted due diligence support on state aid for Birmingham City Council. Commercial property expert Mitchell Ball provides ‘thoughtful’ and ‘considered’ advice and assisted Cherwell District Council with its acquisition of Castle Quay Shopping Centre.

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West Midlands: TMT (technology, media and telecoms)

Intellectual property
Intellectual property - ranked: tier 2

Freeths LLP

Freeths LLP provides 'a great level of service’ where you get ‘timely, pragmatic advice which focuses on the important elements’. The firm primarily works on soft IP matters and is particularly active in the retail sector. Practice head Simon Barker is 'an expert in his field and a safe pair of hands’ and recently advised Birlea Furniture when it took action against Platinum for allegedly infringing upon its BIRLEA trade mark. He also defended Aldi against two separate allegations of trade mark infringement: one from Dualit which alleged it infringed upon the shape of one of its toasters; and another from Miles-Bramwell Executive Services which alleged that the client’s ‘SLIM FREE’ mark infringed upon the accuser’s Slimming World brand. Other key clients include Travis Perkins, Poundland and Center Parcs. Senior associate Kishan Pattni is also a key figure, with notable expertise in the media sector.

Leading individuals

Simon Barker - Freeths LLP

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Further information on Freeths LLP

Please choose from this list to view details of what we say about Freeths LLP in other jurisdictions.

East Midlands

Offices in Nottingham, Derby, and Leicester

London

Offices in London

North West

Offices in Manchester and Liverpool

South East

Offices in Milton Keynes and Oxford

West Midlands

Offices in Birmingham and Stoke on Trent

Yorkshire and the Humber

Offices in Sheffield and Leeds

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