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PwC Legal Pawlowski Zelaznicki Sp. K

POLNA 11, 00-633 WARSAW, POLAND
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Work +48 22 746 4000
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Alicante, Almaty, Baku, Bangkok, Barcelona, Beijing and 78 more

PwC Legal Declaration of diversity

Today's world is subject to constant changes - primarily due to the ongoing globalization and development of technology. Such evolution brings new chances and opportunities, but also the challenges and difficulties, that our organization is facing.

What is Diversity for us?

Diversity is the understanding that each of us represents unrepeatable set of innate and acquired features, which make us unique. It is respect for features and experiences, that are different from our own. It is building bridges of understanding among people, based on the differences between them. In this way, we can fight with discrimination in PwC Legal together, and strive to achieve common goals.

Why do we talk about Diversity?

Diversity of the community means, that together we can achieve more. However, we need to find answers to the questions, that bother us, about how to implement the principles of gender equality, age, race, religion and other factors, that make us differ from each other. That's why we need Diversity Management - by taking action to promote greater inclusion of our people from different backgrounds into the organization structure. Thanks to Diversity, we want to do everything, what we can, to enable our people to fully use their potential - for the welfare of PwC Legal and our clients. Promoting Diversity, we hope to strengthen trust in our local community - to the organization, but above all - to trust people in each other.

How do we care for Diversity?

Bearing in mind the above, PwC Legal undertakes to take care of the atmosphere and organizational culture and manage diversity within the organization, in particular through:

  • increasing our people's awareness of diversity and its level within PwC Poland structures;
  • support for future parents and people bringing up children;
  • promoting the voice of women in the organization and consideration of female perspective on matters relevant to the organization;
  • enabling employees to actively participate in the life and activities of the organization regardless of their position;
  • considerate the position of minorities in the organization - in particular in terms of age, nationality and culture, religion, sexual orientation and disability;
  • equal treatment of individual social groups;

Short version:

Info Connect

Cezary Żelaźnicki - partner responsible for Diversity & Inclusion.

What do we understand by Diversity & Inclusion? We understand Diversity as the differences between each and every one of us, not only in terms of gender, but also such aspects as nationality, world-view or age. In addition to perceiving

An internal project for discussion – 22 March 2019

diversity, we want to support it and work together to create a workplace that addresses the needs of all of us – this is what we mean by Inclusion.

What topics are we going to address first?

  • Parental Support Programme – aimed at supporting parents working at PwC before, during and after their parental leave, to give them more flexibility in combining their professional and private lives
  • PwC for Women – a programme that inspires women working at our company, in such areas as building an effective personal brand, planning a career and balancing life roles We are working on the launch of an internal Diversity & Inclusion platform, which we will use to share knowledge and experiences. The launch is planned for May 2019 and will be accompanied by an information campaign

Legal Developments by:
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Legal Developments in Poland

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