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Chambers of Anna Vigars QC

23 BROAD STREET, BRISTOL, BS1 2HG, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0117 930 9000
Fax:
Fax 0117 930 3800
DX:
7823 BRISTOL
Email:
Web:
www.guildhallchambers.co.uk

Regional Bar: Western Circuit

Clinical negligence

Members of Guildhall Chambers are especially adept at acting for claimants in clinical negligence claims, particularly in cases where quantum and liability are heavily disputed. Surgical negligence and failure to diagnose remain key instructions for the set.

Leading Juniors

Selena Plowden - Guildhall ChambersShe has a tremendous grasp of complex clinical negligence cases.

Ranked: tier 1

Sophie Holme - Guildhall ChambersA very safe pair of hands on high value and complex cases.

Ranked: tier 1

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Commercial, banking, insolvency and Chancery law

Guildhall Chambers has a large number of specialist Chancery and commercial barristers and is particularly prominent in the banking and financial services sectors, where it is described by some instructing solicitors as the 'go-to set' in the region. In a recent highlight matter, Hugh Sims QCGerard McMeel, and James Wibberley represented the respondents in the Supreme Court case Lowick Rose LLP v Swynson Ltd.

Leading Silks

Hugh Sims QC - Guildhall ChambersAn exceptionally able silk with particular expertise in complex Chancery issues.

Ranked: tier 1
Leading Juniors

Gerard McMeel - Guildhall ChambersGerard has an encyclopaedic knowledge of financial services law and remains pre-eminent in the field.

Ranked: tier 1

James Wibberley - Guildhall ChambersCombines a sharp intellect with user-friendliness and good client manner.

Ranked: tier 1

Lucy Walker - Guildhall ChambersSpecialises in advisory work for clients in the financial sector.

Ranked: tier 2

Stefan Ramel - Guildhall ChambersAn excellent insolvency barrister.

Ranked: tier 2

Simon Passfield - Guildhall ChambersRobust, responsive and an able advocate.

Ranked: tier 2

Jay Jagasia - Guildhall ChambersHe has good knowledge of the banking sector.

Ranked: tier 3

John Virgo - Guildhall ChambersExtremely thorough, hardworking, and particularly good with lay clients.

Ranked: tier 3

Richard Ashcroft - Guildhall ChambersExperienced in a wide range of commercial matters.

Ranked: tier 3

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Construction, planning and environment

Guildhall Chambers is particularly notable in the fields of construction and environmental law, with Julian Allsop predominantly acting in the former, and Brendon Moorhouse the key name in the latter. Moorhouse recently acted for several wildlife organisations in their opposition to plans to expand the M4 motorway.

Leading Juniors

Julian Allsop - Guildhall ChambersRecommended for construction litigation.

Ranked: tier 1

Brendon Moorhouse - Guildhall ChambersAn environmental law specialist.

Ranked: tier 2

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Costs

Described by one client as 'a leading set outside London' for costs matters, Guildhall Chambers' costs specialists Oliver Moore and James Wibberley are instructed in all areas of costs work. Wibberley highly experienced in advisory work and costs disputes arising from commercial litigation, and Moore is particularly prevelant in personal inury-related matters.

Leading Juniors

James Wibberley - Guildhall ChambersA very effective advocate.

Ranked: tier 1

Oliver Moore - Guildhall ChambersHe has great attention to detail and is well liked by clients.

Ranked: tier 1

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Crime

Guildhall Chambers is home to a very strong criminal team, with 'incredible breadth and depth'. Key areas of work for the set includes serious violent crime and drug-related offences, but the set is perhaps best known for its members' experience acting in sexual offences cases. Head of chambers Anna Vigars QC recently defended a client accused of murdering his girlfriend, in circumstances where the body was never found, while Mary Cowe prosecuted three defendants charged with a series of frauds relating to a biotechnology company. Rosaleen Collins recently retired from practice.

Leading Silks

Andrew Langdon QC - Guildhall ChambersA very skilled advocate with enormous gravitas in court.

Ranked: tier 1

Anna Vigars QC - Guildhall ChambersHer performance in cases involving complex evidential challenges is truly impressive.

Ranked: tier 1

Christopher Quinlan QC - Guildhall ChambersProsecutes and defends in a wide range of serious cases.

Ranked: tier 2

Richard Smith QC - Guildhall ChambersCouples highly persuasive advocacy with an impressive intellect.

Ranked: tier 2
Leading Juniors

David Scutt - Guildhall ChambersFastidious in his preparation and skilful in court.

Ranked: tier 1

James Haskell - Guildhall ChambersParticularly good with vulnerable complainants and witnesses.

Ranked: tier 1

Mary Cowe - Guildhall ChambersOutstandingly intelligent and tenacious in cross-examination.

Ranked: tier 1

Anjali Gohil - Guildhall ChambersExperienced in a wide range of criminal cases.

Ranked: tier 2

Ramin Pakrooh - Guildhall ChambersConscientious, tenacious and dedicated.

Ranked: tier 2

Ray Tully - Guildhall ChambersHis level of detail is superb, with top-class judgement and a brilliant rapport with clients.

Ranked: tier 2

Tara Wolfe - Guildhall ChambersHer courage in court is self-evident.

Ranked: tier 2

Gregory Godron - Guildhall ChambersAn assured and effective advocate.

Ranked: tier 3

Jennifer Tallentire - Guildhall ChambersTrusted by solicitors with the most vulnerable or challenging defendants.

Ranked: tier 3

Sam Jones - Guildhall ChambersAn exceptional up-and-coming junior.

Ranked: tier 3

Mark Worsley - Guildhall ChambersHis practice covers a broad spectrum of criminal cases.

Ranked: tier 4

Nicolas Gerasimidis - Guildhall ChambersA superb trial lawyer who builds rapport with clients.

Ranked: tier 4

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Employment

Key areas of work for Guildhall Chambers' employment specialists include TUPE, discrimination, whistleblowing, and appeal tribunal work. Of note, Debbie Grennan recently represented 15 claimants in a complex TUPE claim featuring five respondents. The set was recently strengthened with the arrival of Kerry Gardiner from Queen Square Chambers in June 2019.

Leading Juniors

Allan Roberts - Guildhall ChambersParticularly notable for his work on behalf of respondent police forces.

Ranked: tier 1

Debbie Grennan - Guildhall ChambersVery good with difficult clients.

Ranked: tier 1

Douglas Leach - Guildhall ChambersMethodical and structured in his approach.

Ranked: tier 1

Julian Allsop - Guildhall ChambersActs for both defendants and respondents in a wide range of cases

Ranked: tier 1

Nicholas Smith - Guildhall ChambersRecommended for complex first-instance cases and appeals work.

Ranked: tier 1

Kerry Gardiner - Guildhall ChambersProvides very thorough and well-researched advice.

Ranked: tier 2

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Leading Sets
Leading Sets - ranked: tier 1

Guildhall Chambers

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Personal injury

Members of Guildhall Chambers are instructed for all parties in a wide range of personal injury cases, including employer's liability, serious road traffic accidents, contested schedules of loss, and psychiatric injury. Of particular note are James Bentley and John Snell, who respectively specialise in claims where dishonesty is alleged and equine-related injuries.

Leading Juniors

John Snell - Guildhall ChambersParticularly good on Animals Act cases.

Ranked: tier 1

Oliver Moore - Guildhall ChambersVery experienced in all aspects of personal injury law.

Ranked: tier 1

Gabriel Farmer - Guildhall ChambersApproachable and knowledgeable, with sound judgement.

Ranked: tier 2

Julian Benson - Guildhall ChambersHe has a good rapport with both the solicitor and the lay client

Ranked: tier 2

Anthony Reddiford - Guildhall ChambersApproachable and reliable, with a very sound knowledge of personal injury litigation.

Ranked: tier 3

James Bentley - Guildhall ChambersRecommended for cases involving allegations of fundamental dishonesty.

Ranked: tier 3

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Property

Guildhall Chambers' property team is praised by instructing solicitors for the 'vast array of expertise' available, with some feeling that the set 'can and does give London sets a run for their money.' Notable areas of work include agriculture, boundaries and easements, and possession claims. Tim Walsh departed chambers to sit as a district judge.

Leading Juniors

Ewan Paton - Guildhall ChambersIntelligent, persuasive, and thorough.

Ranked: tier 1

William Batstone - Guildhall ChambersAn impressive advocate who provides clear advice.

Ranked: tier 1

George Newsom - Guildhall ChambersMethodical and knowledgeable.

Ranked: tier 2

Michael Selway - Guildhall Chambersprovides extremely in-depth advice and leaves no stone unturned.

Ranked: tier 2

Matthew Wales - Guildhall ChambersStrategic, reliable, and personable.

Ranked: tier 2

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Public law

At Guildhall Chambers, Jorren Knibbe specialises in public procurement work,  acting for both claimants and defendants in a wide range of procurement cases, including advisory work. Rebecca Stickler departed the set in December 2018 for a research position with The Institute For Criminal Policy Research.

Leading Juniors

Jorren Knibbe - Guildhall ChambersRecommended for public procurement matters.

Ranked: tier 1

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Regulatory, health and safety, and licensing

Guildhall Chambers regulatory team is home to a broad range of specialists, and uses this 'strength in numbers' to its advantage, with instructing solicitors praising its 'good availability at all levels of call'. Key areas of work for the set include health and safety, and professional discipline, as well as a sector-specific focus on sports regulation and disciplinary proceedings. Samuel Jones recently defended an auto part manufacturer in a Health and Safety Executive prosecution following an accident at the company's plant. Ian Dixey retired in 2019.

Leading Silks

Andrew Langdon QC - Guildhall ChambersProdigiously hardworking, great with clients, and understands technical issues.

Ranked: tier 1

Christopher Quinlan QC - Guildhall ChambersParticularly recommended for sports disciplinary work.

Ranked: tier 1
Leading Juniors

Sam Jones - Guildhall ChambersGreat with clients and a very confident advocate.

Ranked: tier 1

James Bennett - Guildhall ChambersA star performer in contentious regulatory matters.

Ranked: tier 2

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Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
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