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No5 Barristers Chambers

Chambers of Mark Anderson QC

GREENWOOD HOUSE, 4-7 SALISBURY COURT, LONDON, EC4Y 8AA, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0845 210 5555
Fax:
Fax 020 7900 1582
DX:
449 LONDON CHANCERY LANE
Email:
Web:
www.no5.com

London Bar

Set overviews: England and Wales

One of the largest sets at the English Bar, the ‘impressiveNo5 Barristers Chambers is ‘an efficient, well-run set’ that is ‘able to offer a wide selection of counsel, with strength and depth in a variety of legal areas’. With its origins in Birmingham and strong presences in Bristol and London, it ‘consistently produces remarkable and talented barristers nationwide’. The set has members active across a wide range of areas: ‘a go-to set for many specialist clinical negligence firms with a huge selection of specialists, many of whom with a fantastic reputation’ and ‘a highly experienced serious personal injury group with great strength in depth’; it also has ‘an excellent offering of family law barristers’; is ‘a first choice for Court of Protection work’; offers ‘a wealth of expertise in employment law’; has an ‘outstanding’ commercial and Chancery team, and is ‘still one of the main sets for regulatory law in the Midlands’; has ‘a wide range of experienced and enthusiastic barristers at all levels’ of its crime team; and, for some, is considered ‘one of the best immigration sets in London’. In recent news, family specialist James Snelus arrived from St Mary's Chambers; Steven Fisher joined the personal injury group from Kew Chambers; Keri Tayler joined the public law group from 42 Bedford Row; Jonathan Shaw joined the commercial and Chancery group from Fenwick Elliott LLP; and Samantha Crabb has been appointed a circuit judge; while Alex Cisneros moved to Outer Temple Chambers. Birmingham-based CEO and director of clerking Tony McDaid ‘always comes up with the goods’. Business and property group practice director Danny Griffiths (‘he makes great recommendations of counsel – part of the glue that makes it a great set of chambers’), regulatory and criminal heads Chris Norman and Andrew Trotter (both ‘always accommodating’), ‘helpful’ personal injury and clinical negligence leaders Clare Radburn and Zoe Tinnion and employment practice director Martin Ellis, who is ‘always available to deal with queries and does so efficiently’. Geoff Carr is director of clerking in London. Direct access instructions are sought under the NoVate Direct Legal Solutions banner, which is headed by senior practice manager Russell Hobbs. Solicitors praise the set’s ‘second-to-none’ facilities for being ‘always clean and presentable, with admin staff able to offer assistance and biscuits always offered with tea and coffee’. Tony McDaid is the set’s CEO. Offices in: Birmingham, London, Bristol, and Leicester

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London Bar

Civil liberties and human rights (including actions against the police)
Leading Silks

Manjit Gill QC - No5 Barristers ChambersA very experienced and tenacious advocate.

Ranked: tier 4

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Clinical negligence
Leading Juniors

Stephen Goodfellow - No5 Barristers ChambersA good advocate with an eye for the bigger picture.

Ranked: tier 4

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Crime
Leading Juniors

Philip Rule - No5 Barristers ChambersHe handles challenging criminal appeals.

Ranked: tier 2

Sultana Tafadar - No5 Barristers ChambersA defence junior of note for terrorism cases.

Ranked: tier 3

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Fraud: crime
Leading Silks

Gary Bell QC - No5 Barristers ChambersA remarkable advocate with a very sharp brain.

Ranked: tier 2

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Immigration (including business immigration)
Immigration (including business immigration) - Leading sets - ranked: tier 2

No5 Barristers Chambers

No5 Barristers Chambers 'is one of the best immigration sets', according to its instructing solicitors. In QR (Pakistan) v Secretary of State for the Home DepartmentManjit Singh Gill QC  was involved in an important test case that looked at the efficacy of video-link evidence from abroad. Abid Mahmoud acts for the claimant in PF (Nigeria) v Secretary of State for the Home Department, which concerns the question of whether a 40-year-old father, who has been in the UK with lawful leave to remain since his teenage years, should be deported for class A drugs offences, despite the fact that life-saving treatment is not available in his country of nationality.

Leading Silks

Manjit Gill QC - No5 Barristers ChambersCalm, rational, friendly, approachable, organised, hardworking, extremely intelligent, clear and concise.

Ranked: tier 1
Leading Juniors

S Chelvan - No5 Barristers ChambersHis expertise in sexual identity-related asylum claims is world-renowned.

Ranked: tier 1

Abid Mahmood - No5 Barristers ChambersHe masters the tricky balance in very emotive cases of reassuring clients without sugar coating the pill.

Ranked: tier 2

Ramby de Mello - No5 Barristers ChambersHe is a hot shot in immigration law.

Ranked: tier 2

Danny Bazini - No5 Barristers ChambersHe has grit and determination to win and is highly effective at winning difficult cases.

Ranked: tier 3

Edward Nicholson - No5 Barristers ChambersCommitted, diligent and one of the most talented barristers.

Ranked: tier 3

Joanne Rothwell - No5 Barristers ChambersShe has particular expertise in finding solutions outside of the immigration rules.

Ranked: tier 3

Frances Shaw - No5 Barristers ChambersHer high success rate earned her the title of “invincible barrister”.

Ranked: tier 4

Jessica Smeaton - No5 Barristers ChambersGives clear and constructive guidance in a practical way and has a calm and sympathetic manner.

Ranked: tier 4

Nabila Mallick - No5 Barristers ChambersShe shows exceptional skill and sensitivity in dealing with very challenging situations and turns around paperwork very quickly.

Ranked: tier 4

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Planning
Leading Silks

Martin Kingston QC - No5 Barristers ChambersHe has a track record of airport and nuclear power work.

Ranked: tier 2

Richard Humphreys QC - No5 Barristers ChambersHe handles compulsory purchase and residential matters.

Ranked: tier 4
Leading Juniors

Celina Colquhoun - No5 Barristers ChambersShe has a track record of infrastructure matters.

Ranked: tier 2

Hashi Mohamed - No5 Barristers ChambersHis engaging character helps get judges and planning inspectors on side.

Ranked: tier 4

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Police law (defendant)
Leading Juniors

Colin Banham - No5 Barristers ChambersHe is very knowledgeable and very good with clients.

Ranked: tier 2

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Professional negligence
Leading Silks

Mark Anderson QC - No5 Barristers ChambersHe is a brilliant silk.

Ranked: tier 3

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Set overviews: England and Wales

One of the largest sets at the English Bar, the ‘impressiveNo5 Barristers Chambers is ‘an efficient, well-run set’ that is ‘able to offer a wide selection of counsel, with strength and depth in a variety of legal areas’. With its origins in Birmingham and strong presences in Bristol and London, it ‘consistently produces remarkable and talented barristers nationwide’. The set has members active across a wide range of areas: ‘a go-to set for many specialist clinical negligence firms with a huge selection of specialists, many of whom with a fantastic reputation’ and ‘a highly experienced serious personal injury group with great strength in depth’; it also has ‘an excellent offering of family law barristers’; is ‘a first choice for Court of Protection work’; offers ‘a wealth of expertise in employment law’; has an ‘outstanding’ commercial and Chancery team, and is ‘still one of the main sets for regulatory law in the Midlands’; has ‘a wide range of experienced and enthusiastic barristers at all levels’ of its crime team; and, for some, is considered ‘one of the best immigration sets in London’. In recent news, family specialist James Snelus arrived from St Mary's Chambers; Steven Fisher joined the personal injury group from Kew Chambers; Keri Tayler joined the public law group from 42 Bedford Row; Jonathan Shaw joined the commercial and Chancery group from Fenwick Elliott LLP; and Samantha Crabb has been appointed a circuit judge; while Alex Cisneros moved to Outer Temple Chambers. Birmingham-based CEO and director of clerking Tony McDaid ‘always comes up with the goods’. Business and property group practice director Danny Griffiths (‘he makes great recommendations of counsel – part of the glue that makes it a great set of chambers’), regulatory and criminal heads Chris Norman and Andrew Trotter (both ‘always accommodating’), ‘helpful’ personal injury and clinical negligence leaders Clare Radburn and Zoe Tinnion and employment practice director Martin Ellis, who is ‘always available to deal with queries and does so efficiently’. Geoff Carr is director of clerking in London. Direct access instructions are sought under the NoVate Direct Legal Solutions banner, which is headed by senior practice manager Russell Hobbs. Solicitors praise the set’s ‘second-to-none’ facilities for being ‘always clean and presentable, with admin staff able to offer assistance and biscuits always offered with tea and coffee’. Tony McDaid is the set’s CEO. Offices in: Birmingham, London, Bristol, and Leicester

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Legal Developments in the UK

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Court of Justice rules on source of income for Derivative Residence applications

    On 2 October 2019, the Court of Justice delivered its judgment in Bajratari v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Directive 2004/38/EC) Case C-93/18 which concerns Chen applications and the source of funds for self-sufficiency. 
  • End of the ‘centre of life test’ in Surinder Singh cases?

    In the recent case of  ZA (Reg 9. EEA Regs; abuse of rights) Afghanistan   [2019] UKUT 281 (IAC ), the Upper Tribunal found that there is no basis in EU law for the centre of life test, as set out in Regulation 9(3)(a) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (the “Regulations”). It further found that it is not to be applied when Judges assess  Surinder Singh  cases that appear before them.
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  • 5 FAQS about paragraph 320(11)

    In applications for entry clearance where the applicant has a negative immigration history in the UK, the application may be refused under the general grounds for refusal, which are found in part 9 of the Immigration Rules. Where an applicant has  ‘previously contrived in a significant way to frustrate the intentions of the Immigration Rules’,  the application could be refused under paragraph 320(11). In this post we look at five frequently asked questions about paragraph 320(11). 
  • Multiple nationality and multiple citizenship (including dual nationality and dual citizenship)

    British nationality law permits multiple nationality and multiple citizenship, including dual nationality and dual citizenship.
  • Applying for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the Exceptional Talent or Promise Category

    The  Exceptional Talent  and Exceptional Promise categories are for individuals who are recognised leaders or emerging leaders in their field of expertise. There are a number of endorsing bodies for lots of different fields of work, including  artists and musicians ,  architects ,  digital experts ,  scientists  and  academics . While there isn’t an endorsing body for every expert, the growing list means that many individuals could enjoy the flexibility that this category has to offer. 
  • PARALLEL PROCEEDINGS – CIVIL AND CRIMINAL

    Syedur Rahmanconsiders the factors that determine when civil proceedings can go ahead before,or at the same time as, criminal proceedings relating to the same circumstances.
  • Rights of appeal after the Immigration Act 2014

    The Immigration Act 2014 (“the 2014 Act”) reduced the circumstances in which the refusal of an immigration application will give rise to a right of appeal. The  explanatory notes  to the 2014 Act state that the Act was intended to restructure rights of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal. Previously, a right of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal existed against any of the 14 different immigration decisions listed in s.82 of the  Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002  (“the 2002 Act”). As explained below, whether or not the refusal of an immigration application currently generates a right of appeal depends on the subject matter of the application rather than its categorisation.