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Chambers of Patrick Harrington QC

TEMPLE, LONDON, EC4Y 7BD, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7583 9241
Fax:
Fax 020 7583 0090
DX:
406 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Email:
Web:
www.farrarsbuilding.co.uk

London Bar

Set overviews: England and Wales

Farrar's Building is ‘a good, solid set offering a good variety of barristers in the defendant personal injury market’. Chambers also has expertise in clinical negligence, crime, and professional discipline. ‘There is always a good availability of counsel and if a particular barrister is required the clerks will do their best to free them up if they have an earlier booking.’ Senior clerk Alan Kilbey ‘runs a very tight ship’ ably assisted by first juniors Andrew Duckett and James Shaw. ‘Excellent clerking all round, they will always go the extra mile to accommodate and are honest regarding turnaround times for papers/availability.’ Offices in: London

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London Bar

Clinical negligence
Leading Juniors

Nigel Spencer Ley - Farrar's BuildingAble to think outside the box and very creative in problem-solving.

Ranked: tier 4

Tim Found - Farrar's BuildingParticularly good on paper and sifting through complex evidence.

Ranked: tier 4

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Fraud: crime
Leading Juniors

Neil Baki - Farrar's BuildingHe is very determined, with a great presence in the courtroom.

Ranked: tier 3

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Personal injury, industrial disease and insurance fraud
Personal injury, industrial disease and insurance fraud - Leading sets - ranked: tier 3

Farrar's Building

The 'very approachable and reactive' Farrar's Building has a number of 'great barristers across all levels of experience' who offer 'extremely good service in the defendant personal injury market'. Members are acknowledged for their 'ability to effectively handle large loss claims'. Of note, Alan Jeffreys QC has a particular speciality in liability claims involving multiple collisions, mechanical defect issues, as well as factual and clinical causation. Andrew Wille was instructed by an employer in connection with the group action arising out of the terrorist attack in Algeria, which contends that BP should be held liable for security failings that might otherwise have prevented or mitigated the attack.

Personal Injury - Leading Silks

Alan Jeffreys QC - Farrar's BuildingInvariably spot on when assessing quantum.

Ranked: tier 2
Personal injury - Leading Juniors

Lee Evans - Farrar's BuildingHe is great in conference with experts.

Ranked: tier 2

Helen Hobhouse - Farrar's BuildingShe has effective analysis, promptness and a personable manner.

Ranked: tier 3

Andrew Wille - Farrar's BuildingHe is technically excellent and provides carefully considered advice.

Ranked: tier 4

Guy Watkins - Farrar's BuildingHe instinctively knows which are the points worth taking and which are those that will merely antagonise the Judge.

Ranked: tier 4

John Meredith-Hardy - Farrar's BuildingHe is a great draftsman and will not be brow beaten by opponent.

Ranked: tier 4

Andrew Peebles - Farrar's BuildingHe is able to deal with complex issues and is firm in his approach.

Ranked: tier 5

James Pretsell - Farrar's BuildingHe is good on his feet, whilst his written work is clear, concise and thorough.

Ranked: tier 5

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Professional disciplinary and regulatory law
Leading Silks

Geoffrey Williams QC - Farrar's BuildingHis knowledge of solicitors' disciplinary law is first-rate.

Ranked: tier 3
Leading Juniors

Leighton Hughes - Farrar's BuildingRobust in preparation and well versed in regulatory law.

Ranked: tier 4

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Set overviews: England and Wales

Farrar's Building is ‘a good, solid set offering a good variety of barristers in the defendant personal injury market’. Chambers also has expertise in clinical negligence, crime, and professional discipline. ‘There is always a good availability of counsel and if a particular barrister is required the clerks will do their best to free them up if they have an earlier booking.’ Senior clerk Alan Kilbey ‘runs a very tight ship’ ably assisted by first juniors Andrew Duckett and James Shaw. ‘Excellent clerking all round, they will always go the extra mile to accommodate and are honest regarding turnaround times for papers/availability.’ Offices in: London

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Further information on Farrar's Building (Chambers of Patrick Harrington QC)

Please choose from this list to view details of what we say about Farrar's Building (Chambers of Patrick Harrington QC) in other jurisdictions.

London Bar

Offices in London

Regional Bar

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