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DLA Piper

LEVEL 31, CENTRAL PARK, 152 - 158 ST GEORGES TERRACE, PERTH, WA 6000, AUSTRALIA
Tel:
Work +61 8 6467 6000
Fax:
Fax +61 8 6467 6001
DX:
130 PERTH
Email:
Web:
www.dlapiper.com

Alex Jones

Tel:
Work +61 8 6467 6204
Email:
DLA Piper LLP (US)

Work Department

Partner, Finance & Projects

Position

Alex is a partner in the Finance & Projects team in Perth. He provides advice in relation to the development and operation of mines and major infrastructure, including port, rail, gas, electricity and water. Alex regularly provides advice and assistance to industry in relation to regulatory reform through various committees and groups. To ensure a seamless provision of services, Alex also manages contentious work arising from the regulatory work. This includes the management of a large practice representing resource companies in administrative proceedings before the Mining Warden, including objections to tenement applications, applications for forfeiture and objections to exemption applications. Alex has considerable experience in proceedings for judicial review to overturn administrative decisions including Ministerial decisions. He also represents mining and infrastructure companies in general commercial litigation in the Supreme and Federal courts, including construction litigation and joint venture disputes. Alex has experience in preparing a full range of commercial agreements associated with project development and operations, including joint venture agreements, mining agreements, construction agreements and consultancy agreements.

Member

Australian Mining & Petroleum Law Association National Environmental Law Association Chamber of Minerals & Energy Association of Mineral Exploration Companies

Education

Bachelor of Laws, University of Western Australia, 1998 Bachelor of Arts, University of Western Australia, 1998


Australia

Natural resources (transactions and regulatory)

Within: Natural resources (transactions and regulatory)

DLA Piper’s 16-partner team attracted a steady domestic and international deal flow, advising the SGX-listed Alliance Mineral Assets on its announced merger with the ASX-listed Tawana Resources, as well as Atlas Iron on its agreement with Mineral Resources to combine via a scheme of arrangement. Regulatory work included advising Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal Management on access and regulatory issues. Alex Jones co-heads the global mining group out of Perth; the team includes regulatory expert Simon Uthmeyer, transactions specialist Michael Bowen and counsel Joanne Steer, who has a particular focus on advising mining sector clients. David Nancarrow left to take up a role in-house at Byrnecut Australia.

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Project development

Within: Project development

DLA Piper possesses considerable PPP expertise, including advising governments on structuring PPP schemes, and handles a range of infrastructure as well as renewables and mining sector matters. The team has seen some change, with Dan Brown and former head of PPP and transport Alex Guy leaving for Ashurst, and Simon Huxley joining Allen & Overy LLP; however, the firm has appointed new partners Alyson Eather and Rhys Davies and grew at associate and counsel level. Resolute Mining received advice on the development of the Syama and Ravenswood mining operations in Mali and Queensland, respectively. Infrastructure work included the team’s advice to the Acciona Ferrovial joint venture on the Melbourne Metro Tunnels and Stations PPP project. Alex Jones leads on mining project matters, and Stephen Webb handles energy projects work. Alex Regan and John Gallagher are also names to note. Finance and projects lawyer Kate Papailiou has ‘strong business acumen and industry knowledge’ and displays ‘strong work ethic’.

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Legal Developments by:
DLA Piper LLP (US)

  • Sentencing guidelines for corporate manslaughter

    In February 2010 the Sentencing Guidelines Council (the SGC) issued definitive guidelines to courts on imposing appropriate sentences for corporate manslaughter and health and safety offences causing death. The SGC states that fines imposed on companies found guilty of corporate manslaughter should not fall below £500,000, while fines in respect of health and safety offences that are a significant cause of death should be at least £100,000. Crucially, the SGC declined to provide for a fixed link between the imposed fine and the turnover or profitability of the offending company.

    - DLA Piper UK LLP

Legal Developments worldwide

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
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