The Legal 500

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PASEO DE LA REFORMA 115, 15th Floor, COL. LOMAS DE CHAPULTEPEC, CP 11000, MEXICO
Tel:
Work +52 55 2623 0552
Email:
Web:
www.wll.com.mx

Derek Woodhouse

Tel:
Work +52 (55)2623 0552
Email:
Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow

Work Department

Energy, Oil & Gas, Electricity, Renewables, Projects, Infrastructure, Project Finance, PPP.

Position

Partner

Career

  • 2009 – present: Partner, Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow, S.C., Mexico City
  • 2006 – 2009: Counsel, Chadbourne & Parke, S.C., Mexico City
  • 2001 – 2005: Senior Associate, CMS Cameron McKenna LLP, London, UK
  • 1999 – 2000: General Counsel, Energy Regulatory Commission, Power Sector Reform Unit, Mexico City
  • 1996 – 1999: Deputy General Counsel, Energy Regulatory Commission, Department of Legal Affairs, Mexico City
  • 1994 – 1996: Advisor to the Commissioner, Energy Regulatory Commission, Mexico City
  • 1993 – 1994: Advisor to the General Counsel, Energy Ministry, Department of Legal Affairs, Mexico City

Languages

Spanish, English.

Education

  • Escuela Libre de Derecho, Mexico City, Law Degree, 1988 – 1996
  • George Washington University, International Law Institute, Washington D.C., United States, Postgraduate Studies, Introduction to the United States Legal System, 1997
  • Harvard University, Center for International Development, Boston, Massachussets, United States, Postgraduate Studies, International Program on Privatization, Regulations and Corporate Governance, 1999.


Latin America: International firms

Projects and energy

Within: Projects and energy

The ‘excellentCMS has significantly expanded its Latin America practice with firms in Chile, Peru and Colombia joining the CMS global network in early 2017, linking up with existing offices in Rio de Janeiro and Mexico City. Clients report that ‘response times are always fast’, lawyers’ ‘knowledge of the industry is extensive’ and ‘pricing is amazing for the value it delivers’. The Mexico City office is well known for having advised the Mexican Ministry of Energy (SENER) on the reform of the electricity industry and it continues to be involved in the transformation of that sector. In Brazil, the firm represented PetroRio on a range of FPSO charter and operation agreements and crude oil sales contracts. In Chile, Luis Felipe Arze is ‘highly committed’, ‘always seems one step ahead’ and ‘knows the market inside and out’; he recently advised Eléctricas de Medellín Ingeniería y Servicios on the construction of a new transmission line to help connect Chile’s two main energy systems, Sistema Interconectado Central and Sistema Interconectado Norte Grande. Fellow Chile partner Jorge Allende is a prominent name in mining, energy and resources. Rio partner Ted Rhodes has a fine record on oil-and-gas work in Brazil and elsewhere, and Derek Woodhouse is a big name in Mexico City.

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Mexico

Energy and natural resources

Within: Leading lawyers

Derek Woodhouse - Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow

Within: Energy and natural resources

Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow has extensive expertise in the power sector, having spent the last few years advising the Energy Ministry on the implementation of the Wholesale Electricity Market and the restructuring of the Federal Electricity Commission. The firm is also increasingly active for the private sector, and advised EDF on the implementation of 480MW worth of solar and wind power projects awarded in the second long-term auction. Another major highlight on the energy infrastructure side was advising Energyland on a MX$12bn waste-to-energy project to generate electricity for Mexico City’s subway system. The highly respected Derek Woodhouse heads the team.

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Projects and infrastructure

Within: Leading lawyers

Derek Woodhouse - Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow

Within: Projects and infrastructure

Appreciated for its ‘personalised attention’, Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow has an extremely active practice advising private and public sector clients on a range of energy and infrastructure projects. It has been involved in several pioneering projects, and recently acted for Energyland on a MXN$12bn waste-to-energy PPP project to generate electricity for the Mexico City subway system. Other highlights included advising the Mexico City government on the public expropriation and development of land for three major transport hubs, to include office, retail and hotel space. ‘Very intelligent’ name partner Enrique Lorente Ludlow is particularly active on the infrastructure side, and is noted for his ability to find ‘innovative solutions’. Derek Woodhouse is very experienced in energy matters.

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Legal Developments in Mexico

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Notorious Marks

    Notorious marks or the declaration thereof, has always been an issue widely discussed in Mexico by the IP legal community. This is so because provisions of the Paris Convention dealing with this topic have for a long time been uses as an effort to cancel or nullify trademarks registered by Mexican authorities without really making an extensive evaluation of proposed denominations and without examining in depth if such marks may be potentially affecting rights acquired by third parties elsewhere. So, a specific regulation and legal frame that at least tries to resolve this issue is always a good start in the right direction.
  • FRANCHISING TRENDS IN MEXICO: A NEW VALUE

    By Ignacio Dominguez Torrado Uhthoff, Gomez Vega & Uhthoff, S.C. Why a new value? Is Mexico avoiding the economic fallout that the world may be facing? In Mexico franchises are worth more? Is Mexico not a country that the global economic standstill is or will affect? The answer is, not really. Are Franchises in Mexico currently experiencing a boom? Perhaps. Are Franchises becoming an important aspect in Mexican economy? Certainly.
  • ADVERTISING IN MEXICO: COMMENTS UNDER AN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW PERSPECTIVE

    Advertising in Mexico is governed by multiple bodies of law including for at least seven Federal Laws, five Regulations also of Federal application, a number of the so-called Mexican Official Standards (NOM's) and certain other laws and regulations applicable into specific States within the Republic of Mexico. All of them are focusing to establish the form and manners for producing and communicating advertising of products and services in Mexico.
  • MEXICAN CUSTOMS. UPDATE ON THE ENFORCEMENT OF TRADEMARK RIGHTS

    It has been well publicized in the Mexican media over the last few months that the General Customs Administration (AGA) and the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property (IMPI) are planning to launch a customs trademark registry, as a short-term solution to increase protection for trademark owners against the import of infringing and counterfeit products.
  • DEMONSTRATING USE OF TRADEMARKS UNDER MEXICAN LAW AND PRACTICE

    The evolution in the protection and enforcement of IP rights has also reached the Mexican practice. The traditional ways of defending a registered trademark on a non use contentious procedure have developed.
  • ANTI-COUNTERFEITING IN MEXICO

    By Jose Luis Ramos-Zurita