The Legal 500

Twitter Logo Youtube Circle Icon LinkedIn Icon
PASEO DE LA REFORMA 115, 15th Floor, COL. LOMAS DE CHAPULTEPEC, CP 11000, MEXICO
Tel:
Work +52 55 2623 0552
Email:
Web:
www.wll.com.mx

Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow, S.C. (WLL) is a law firm comprising of a team of specialists with ample experience in energy, infrastructure, real estate and climate change. Since 2013, WLL has worked as CMS Cameron McKenna’s local office in Mexico. CMS is a leading global law firm in the energy and projects sectors. WLL is primarily known for its participation in large-scale and innovative projects, advising government agencies on the design and implementation of new legal and regulatory frameworks; advising sponsors and other developers on the promotion, participation and development of pathfinder projects; and advising lenders and other investors on the financing of those projects.

Types of work undertaken

WLL’s team of experts is the most complete and prepared in Mexico in the electricity sector, and through its association with CMS Cameron McKenna, WLL offers the most qualified international expertise in Mexico in electricity, as well as in exploration and production of deepwater hydrocarbons. Together with CMS, part of the WLL team is currently advising the Energy Ministry on the implementation of the wholesale electricity market, and the restructuring of the Federal Electricity Commission (CFE), including the drafting of the Electricity Market Bases and Business Practice Manuals. Likewise, the IADB has engaged WLL to assist the Energy Ministry on drafting the geothermal energy law and its regulations. Another part of the firm’s team is advising some of the largest worldwide and local companies in the sector.

WLL’s projects/infrastructure practice is a market leader in Mexico. Its lawyers specialize in all aspects required for an exemplary infrastructure practice, from the design and preparation of constitutional, legislative and regulatory reforms to the financing and execution of infrastructure projects, including their structuring and allocation, as well as dispute resolution. Having actively participated in the promotion and improvement of public-private partnership (PPP) programs for the development of public infrastructure and services, WLL’s lawyers are among the most experienced and knowledgeable in Mexico regarding PPP projects. They have advised the Mexican Federal Government and local governments throughout Mexico on amending the existing legal framework and issuing new regulations to incorporate various forms of PPP, including the PPS, and have also advised on the implementation of pathfinder PPP projects such as the Federal Prisons Program and various local prisons, roads and hospitals.

WLL’s real estate practice has over 20 years of experience collaborating with developers, institutional investors and lenders to guarantee the completion of real estate projects, including commercial real estate and financing. Projects include industrial, residential, tourism, office buildings, transportation hubs and mixed-use buildings.

WLL’s attorneys are in direct and constant contact with corporate and administrative law matters, and have broad experience advising on the incorporation of companies with foreign investment, international businesses, international trade, structuring and negotiation of commercial agreements, transformation and dissolution of commercial entities, corporate finance programs, trusts, incorporation of special purpose entities and representation of foreign companies in Mexico.

Through its alliance with LAGUNA, WLL represents one of Mexico’s leading environmental law and climate change practices.

Partners: 2

Other fee-earners: 20

Total staff: 30

Above material supplied by Woodhouse Lorente Ludlow.

Legal Developments in Mexico

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Notorious Marks

    Notorious marks or the declaration thereof, has always been an issue widely discussed in Mexico by the IP legal community. This is so because provisions of the Paris Convention dealing with this topic have for a long time been uses as an effort to cancel or nullify trademarks registered by Mexican authorities without really making an extensive evaluation of proposed denominations and without examining in depth if such marks may be potentially affecting rights acquired by third parties elsewhere. So, a specific regulation and legal frame that at least tries to resolve this issue is always a good start in the right direction.
  • FRANCHISING TRENDS IN MEXICO: A NEW VALUE

    By Ignacio Dominguez Torrado Uhthoff, Gomez Vega & Uhthoff, S.C. Why a new value? Is Mexico avoiding the economic fallout that the world may be facing? In Mexico franchises are worth more? Is Mexico not a country that the global economic standstill is or will affect? The answer is, not really. Are Franchises in Mexico currently experiencing a boom? Perhaps. Are Franchises becoming an important aspect in Mexican economy? Certainly.
  • ADVERTISING IN MEXICO: COMMENTS UNDER AN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW PERSPECTIVE

    Advertising in Mexico is governed by multiple bodies of law including for at least seven Federal Laws, five Regulations also of Federal application, a number of the so-called Mexican Official Standards (NOM's) and certain other laws and regulations applicable into specific States within the Republic of Mexico. All of them are focusing to establish the form and manners for producing and communicating advertising of products and services in Mexico.
  • MEXICAN CUSTOMS. UPDATE ON THE ENFORCEMENT OF TRADEMARK RIGHTS

    It has been well publicized in the Mexican media over the last few months that the General Customs Administration (AGA) and the Mexican Institute of Industrial Property (IMPI) are planning to launch a customs trademark registry, as a short-term solution to increase protection for trademark owners against the import of infringing and counterfeit products.
  • DEMONSTRATING USE OF TRADEMARKS UNDER MEXICAN LAW AND PRACTICE

    The evolution in the protection and enforcement of IP rights has also reached the Mexican practice. The traditional ways of defending a registered trademark on a non use contentious procedure have developed.
  • ANTI-COUNTERFEITING IN MEXICO

    By Jose Luis Ramos-Zurita