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Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C.

RUBEN DARIO 281, PISOS 9, COL. BOSQUE DE CHAPULTEPEC, 11580 MEXICO, D.F., MEXICO
Tel:
Work +52 55 5282 1100
Fax:
Fax +52 55 5282 0061
Email:
Web:
www.curtis.com/mexicocity
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Mexico

Banking and finance
Banking and finance - ranked: tier 5

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C.

The banking and finance practice at Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C. handles oil and gas project financings for state-owned entities, as well as corporate, structured, trade, export and project finance, PPPs, equipment leasing, and securitisation and other asset-based financing for borrowers, issuers, lenders and investors; it also handles regulatory work. Recent highlights for the seven-strong group included acting as Mexican counsel to PNC Bank in several transactions including a $135m secured revolving credit facility to C&D Technologies; a $225m secured revolving credit facility to TaylorMade Company subsidiary, 19th Holdings (Delaware); and a secured revolving credit facility for an aggregate amount of $65mn to Robertshaw US Holding Corp et al. In other work, the team advised Grupo Posadas, as seller and lessee, on a Mexican-peso sale and leaseback transaction (equivalent to $154m) of its hotel Fiesta Americana Condesa Cancún to FibraHotel; and Banobras, on the negotiation and implementation of a peso-denominated secured credit facility (as additional indebtedness) to Red de Carreteras de Occidente under an existing MXN$4bn financing structure. Rodrigo Valverde leads the team and acted on all the above highlights. Other team members include Mexico City managing partner Eloy Barbará de Parres (project finance), Javier Jimenez (commercial transactions in the oil and gas sector), and Santiago Corcuera (debt and equity securities).

Next generation lawyers

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Dispute resolution
Dispute resolution - ranked: tier 3

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C.

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C. is particularly well known for its expertise in international arbitration and investment treaty disputes. The ‘well-trained’ Mexican team is distinguished by its ‘ability to work internationally, bringing together different offices and capacities to serve a client anywhere in the world’. The team is jointly led by Eloy Barbará de Parres and the ‘extraordinary’ Gabriela Alvarez-Avila, who is singled out for her arbitration experience. Santiago Corcuera-Cabezut is highlighted for his ‘internationally recognised work in human rights’, and the US-trained Kate Brown de Vejar is well respected for her expertise in investment treaty disputes. Recent highlights for the team include its involvement in representing the Republic of Venezuela in its respective ICSID disputes with Mobil, Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, Venoklim Holding and ConocoPhillips.

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Energy and natural resources
Energy and natural resources - ranked: tier 3

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C.

Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle S.C. has been a mainstay of the Mexican oil and gas market for many years, with experience across corporate and regulatory matters and also disputes (particularly major international arbitrations). Eloy Barbará de Parres heads the six-partner team, which includes Javier Jiménez, who is experienced in advising state-owned entities such as Pemex. Other key clients include GDF Suez, Petróleos de Venezuela, and the Republic of Venezuela, which the team has been assisting in its investment treaty dispute with ConocoPhillips.

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Legal Developments in Mexico

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Notorious Marks

    Notorious marks or the declaration thereof, has always been an issue widely discussed in Mexico by the IP legal community. This is so because provisions of the Paris Convention dealing with this topic have for a long time been uses as an effort to cancel or nullify trademarks registered by Mexican authorities without really making an extensive evaluation of proposed denominations and without examining in depth if such marks may be potentially affecting rights acquired by third parties elsewhere. So, a specific regulation and legal frame that at least tries to resolve this issue is always a good start in the right direction.
  • FRANCHISING TRENDS IN MEXICO: A NEW VALUE

    By Ignacio Dominguez Torrado Uhthoff, Gomez Vega & Uhthoff, S.C. Why a new value? Is Mexico avoiding the economic fallout that the world may be facing? In Mexico franchises are worth more? Is Mexico not a country that the global economic standstill is or will affect? The answer is, not really. Are Franchises in Mexico currently experiencing a boom? Perhaps. Are Franchises becoming an important aspect in Mexican economy? Certainly.
  • ADVERTISING IN MEXICO: COMMENTS UNDER AN INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW PERSPECTIVE

    Advertising in Mexico is governed by multiple bodies of law including for at least seven Federal Laws, five Regulations also of Federal application, a number of the so-called Mexican Official Standards (NOM's) and certain other laws and regulations applicable into specific States within the Republic of Mexico. All of them are focusing to establish the form and manners for producing and communicating advertising of products and services in Mexico.
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  • DEMONSTRATING USE OF TRADEMARKS UNDER MEXICAN LAW AND PRACTICE

    The evolution in the protection and enforcement of IP rights has also reached the Mexican practice. The traditional ways of defending a registered trademark on a non use contentious procedure have developed.
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    By Jose Luis Ramos-Zurita