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Baker McKenzie Yangon

UNIT 18-03, 18TH FLOOR, SULE SQUARE, 221 SULE PAGODA ROAD, PABEDAN TOWNSHIP, YANGON, MYANMAR
Tel:
Work +95 1 255 056
Fax:
Fax +95 1 255 058
Email:
Web:
http://www.bakermckenzie.com/en/locations/asia-pacific/myanmar

When It Comes to People

We are committed to diversity and inclusion in our people, support and development of their talent, and dignity and safety in our workplaces. Baker McKenzie also is a signatory to the UN Global Compact, a voluntary global initiative in which we have committed to align our policies and operations with ten principles in the areas of human rights, fair labor, the environment and anti-corruption.

Diversity and Inclusion

Baker McKenzie was founded on the idea of diversity. From our earliest days, we have strived to nurture a respectful, inclusive environment that encourages diverse individuals to thrive personally and professionally as full contributors to the success of the Firm and the clients we serve. We do not permit or tolerate discrimination in our workplaces. This means:

  • All personnel decisions must be: a) respectful of differences among employees and potential employees, b) based on factors relevant to their ability to perform the work they are, or would be expected to do, and c) in accordance with all applicable laws and regulations.
  • This includes decisions related to the recruiting, hiring, assignment, compensation, training and development, promotion and dismissal of personnel, as well as other terms and conditions of employment.
  • Applicable local laws, which we follow, vary, but differences that we strive to overlook in personnel decisions include race, color, creed, religion, citizenship, national origin, ethnicity and/or cultural background, age, sex, gender, gender identity/expression, sexual orientation, marital status, pregnancy and disability.

While our approach to diversity and inclusion is multi-faceted, three areas where we have specific policies are:

Ethnic & Cultural Diversity

Ethnicity means different things in different countries, so a single approach to ethnic and cultural diversity is ill-advised. This is why we build practices from the ground up, taking local cultural sensitivities into consideration wherever we practice law. Despite the challenges, we have a strong desire to address a lack of equity around the world and encourage each of our offices to define race/ethnic diversity in a way that suits their local culture, politics, clients and business environment.

Gender Diversity

We believe women must be leaders at all levels of our Firm. We seek to foster women leaders in our senior global roles but we are also focusing on ensuring that women are leaders of our most significant client relationships. Since 2012, we have adopted a gender policy designed to encourage the recruitment and retention of more women, and provide greater opportunities and support for women to assume leadership roles. At the partner level, we have set gender diversity aspirational targets – we are working to ensure that women comprise at least 40% of local/national partners and at least 30% of principals and those in leadership positions.

LGBT Diversity

Everyone should feel comfortable in the workplace, regardless of their sexual orientation or gender identity and expression. We are committed to creating and maintaining an open and supportive working environment. This includes equal opportunity for advancement and development within the firm regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, and the equal provision of benefits to same and opposite sex partners or spouses.

We have made great strides in encouraging equality in our Firm and in engaging in these crucial conversations on a global basis. Our seven basic principles include:

Principle 1. Establish high-level corporate leadership for gender equality;
Principle 2. Treat all women and men fairly at work – respect and support human rights and non-discrimination;
Principle 3. Ensure the health, safety and well-being of all women and men workers;
Principle 4. Promote education, training and professional development for women;
Principle 5. Implement enterprise development, supply chain and marketing practices that empower women;
Principle 6. Promote equality through community initiatives and advocacy; and
Principle 7. Measure and publicly report on progress to achieve gender equality.

Legal Developments by:
Baker McKenzie

  • The New Turkish Code of Obligations: Important Changes for Leases of Residential & Business Premises

    For decades, the primary Turkish laws governing leases of residential and business premises have been the Law on Leasing Real Property dated May 27, 1955 (the “Lease Law”) and the Turkish Code of Obligations No. 818 dated April 22, 1926 (the “Obligations Code”). Both of these laws, however, will be repealed and replaced with the new Turkish Code of Obligations No. 6098 dated January 11, 2011 (the “New Obligations Code”), which will enter into force on July 7, 2012.
    - Esin Attorney Partnership

Legal Developments worldwide

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Consolidated Group (Income Tax) Rules, 2019

    On 31 May 2019, Malta published the “Consolidated Group (Income Tax) Rules". The rules will come into force as from year of assessment 2020 and the rules introduce the concept of fiscal units into Maltese tax law .
  • Renewable energy in Ukraine: green auctions launched

    In the first half of 2019 alone, renewable energy facilities with a capacity of more than 1.5 GW were connected to the Ukrainian grid, with about 96% of those being solar and wind energy facilities. In the whole of 2018, which has been a record-breaking year so far, numbers were almost half as high. The Ukrainian market also remains very attractive to foreign investors, not least because of the lucrative feed-in tariff rates, which are paid out regularly. Now, after the adoption of the so-called law on green auctions, significant changes can be expected.
  • Economic Substance Requirements - Fund Managers

    The International Tax Co-operation (Economic Substance) Law, 2018 (the “ES Law”) came into effect in the Cayman Islands on 1 January 2019, requiring in-scope entities that carry on particular activities to have demonstrable economic substance in the Cayman Islands.
  • Shipping at the spotlight of terrorism

    Is terrorism the new norm for shipping?
  • Adidas three stripe Trademark Revocation

    In a judgment of the General Court of the European Union of the 19th June 2019, Adidas saw their hopes of extending their three stripes trademark dashed, as the court ruled that there was no distinctiveness in the three stripes trademark. Furthermore, the court held that the Adidas had failed to prove that the mark had acquired distinctive character through use throughout the member states of the EU.
  • David against Goliath – Libra vs Central Banks: Who will win?

    Working in the crypto and DLT space is like being on an emotional rollercoaster with feelings which range from curiosity, excitement, euphoria, revelation, shock, disappointment, hope, wonder and determination – did I miss any?
  • UK Telecoms company fined £100K over unsolicited marketing messages

    The Information Commissioner’s Office (‘ICO’) which is the UK’s data protection supervisory authority, recently issued a fine of £100,000 to EE Limited, a telecoms company operating in the UK. The fine was issued in response to EE Limited having sent two and a half million unsolicited direct marketing messages to its customers, back in early 2018. The direct marketing messages were sent without EE Limited having first obtained the required consent to send them to its clients.
  • British Airways and Marriott International Inc. face huge fines from UK data protection authority

    British Airways (‘BA’) may be hit with what will be the highest-ever penalty which the Information Commissioner’s Office (‘ICO’), the UK’s data protection supervisory authority, has handed out.
  • UAE Tax domicile certificate

    Issued by the Ministry of Finance in the United Arab Emirates (‘UAE’), the Tax Domicile Certificate (also referred to as the Tax Residency Certificate) enables eligible government entities, companies and individuals to take advantage of double taxation avoidance agreements on income signed by the UAE.
  • The Cayman Islands Data Protection Law, 2017

    The following information relates to the enactment of The Cayman Islands Data Protection Law, 2017 (" DPL "), which was expected to come into force on 29 January 2019, will now come into force in September 2019. The DPL will regulate the future processing of all personal data in the Cayman Islands.