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Brodies LLP

15 ATHOLL CRESCENT, EDINBURGH, EH3 8HA, SCOTLAND
Tel:
Work 0131 228 3777
Fax:
Fax 0131 228 3878
DX:
ED10 EDINBURGH-1
Email:
Web:
www.brodies.com
Brodies LLP, Christine O’neill, Edinburgh, SCOTLAND

Christine O’neill

Tel:
Work 0131 656 0286
Email:
Brodies LLP

Work Department

Litigation/public sector services.

Position

Recognised specialist in constitutional and administrative law litigation. Chairman and partner in the firm’s public law and regulatory practice. Speaks regularly at conferences on topics such as devolution, information law and human rights. Combines experience in public law litigation, including judicial review, statutory appeals and contentious public procurement with her role in advising clients on Scottish devolution, legislation and administrative law. A solicitor advocate and standing junior to the Scottish government.

Career

Qualified 1999; full-time lecturer in constitutional and administrative law, Edinburgh Law School 1999-2000; solicitor then senior solicitor Brodies LLP 2000-03; associate 2003-04; partner 200; chairman 2013. Publications: co-author with Chris Himsworth ‘Scotland’s Constitution: Law and Practice’ (Bloomsbury 3rd edition 2015).

Member

Law Society of Scotland.

Education

LLB Hons; Dip LP; LLM.

IHL Briefings

If your firm wishes to publish IHL Briefings or articles, please contact Antony Dine on +44 (0) 207 396 9315 or antony.dine@legalease.co.uk

 

A time of change for Scotland’s constitution

June 2016. By Christine O'Neil

It has been a busy time for ScotlandÂ’s constitution. No sooner was the 2014 independence referendum out of the way than the debates and arguments began on new powers for the Scottish parliament. That debate resulted in the Scotland Act 2016, passed shortly before MayÂ’s Scottish parliament election. [Continue Reading]

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Legal Developments by:
Brodies LLP

  • Scottish planning obligations: modification and discharge – the story so far


    Planning obligations 1 (formerly agreements), which restrict or regulate the use or development of land, perform a crucial function within the planning system. In Scotland in particular, where the community infrastructure levy has not been adopted, the planning obligation continues to be the primary mechanism for the delivery of much needed local and regional infrastructure through developer contributions, often involving very significant sums. 

    - Brodies LLP

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