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Addleshaw Goddard

MILTON GATE, 60 CHISWELL STREET, LONDON, EC1Y 4AG, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7606 8855
Fax:
Fax 020 7606 4390
DX:
47 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Email:
Web:
www.addleshawgoddard.com

Address: Milton Gate, 60 Chiswell Street, London, EC1Y 4AG

Web: www.addleshawgoddard.com

Email: grad@addleshawgoddard.com


 


Survey results

 

The lowdown (in their own words...)

Why did you choose this firm over any others? 
 '‘Market position within Manchester’; ‘I wanted to complete London-style work without having to live in London’; ‘reputation in Leeds’; ‘particular focus on provision for women’; ‘good experience on the vacation scheme’; ‘great training’; ‘broad range of specialties’; ‘inclusive and welcoming environment’; ‘collegiate feel’
Best thing about the firm? 
 '‘The supportive, welcoming and non-hierarchical working environment’; ‘the opportunities given in each seat to take on responsibility, broaden your skillset and be challenged in the work you’re doing’; ‘the partners are great’; ‘excellent canteen’; ‘friendly atmosphere’; ‘responsibility and deal exposure’; ‘calibre of work and clients’
Worst thing about the firm? 
 '‘Salary’; ‘unequal workloads between divisions’; ‘occasional IT issues’; ‘training across departments is inconsistent’; ‘the hours’; ‘work/life balance’; ‘out-of-hours support isn’t too good’; ‘not much transparency around how seat moves are decided’; ‘unclear policies and procedures’
Best moment? 
 '‘An intense and satisfying corporate seat’; ‘closing a deal just before Christmas and going home at 2pm to celebrate’; ‘attending a business development evening with a barristers’ chambers and being wined and dined in London’; ‘being asked to run a meeting with three clients on my own’; ‘having an integral role on a large financing where I assisted in drafting many of the key documents and leading the signing meeting’
Worst moment?
 '‘Having to complete tasks which it would be more appropriate for admin colleagues to complete’; ‘accidentally sending a document to the incorrect recipient’; ‘doing an all-nighter on a Friday through to Saturday morning with no days off as compensation’; ‘seat move politics’; ‘not having enough work for several weeks’; ‘being told by a supervisor that there was a perception I wasn’t busy – this was a real kick in the teeth and ended up having a demotivating effect on me’'

If the firm were a fictional character it would be...

Matilda Wormwood (Roald Dahl) – very friendly and unassuming but underestimate her at your peril

The verdict

The firm

Addleshaw Goddard has offices in London, Manchester and Leeds, as well as in Singapore, Dubai, Doha, Muscat and Hong Kong. The firm is a market leader across its chosen sectors: digital, financial services, energy and utilities, health, industrials, retail and consumer, real estate and transport, and boasts an impressive FTSE 100 client base.  

The star performers

Banking and finance; Banking litigation; Commercial property; Construction; Corporate and commercial; Corporate restructuring and insolvency; Corporate tax; Education; Employment; Energy; Health; IT and telecoms; Intellectual property; Local government; Media and entertainment; Pensions; Personal tax, trusts and probate; Product liability: defendant; Project finance and PFI; Property litigation; Transport

The deals

Handled BP’s acquisition of a minority stake in Lightsource Renewable Energy Investments for $200m; advised Transport for Greater Manchester on establishing a highways shared services arrangement with three Greater Manchester local authorities; advised Mark and Lucy Millar on the sale of comic book company Millarworld to Netflix; acted for Paragon Housing Association in its circa £1m turn-key acquisition of completed new-build properties in Alva; advised Stoke City Council on a proposed variation and refinancing of its pathfinder street lighting PFI Scheme

The clients

Aviva Life and Pensions; British Airways; HSBC Bank; JD Sports; Link Group; MoneySuperMarket.com; Norcros; Primark Stores; Wheatley Housing Group; Wolseley UK

The verdict

Addleshaw Goddard trainees were extremely complimentary of the firm’s culture, and appreciative of the ‘supportive, welcoming and non-hierarchical working environment’. Many felt that everyone from support staff to partners were ‘willing to help and create an inclusive atmosphere’. The firm’s regional presence was also a big draw, with a few individuals citing the firm’s strong reputation in Manchester and Leeds as a big reason for applying: ‘I wanted to complete London-style work without having to live in London’ says one recruit. Also commended was the quality of work trainees are exposed to, with one respondent seeing this as important for being ‘properly prepared to take on work of the same nature post-qualification’. The ‘responsibility given to trainees’ was an aspect of the training contract that several appreciated – there is an ‘excellent amount of independence and responsibility’ and you are ‘trusted from an early stage to manage your work and client contacts’. What disgruntled some trainees, however, was the firm’s financial remuneration, which ‘could be more competitive’ to ‘reflect the status of Addleshaw Goddard as a top-tier law firm’. Training across departments was also felt to be inconsistent: ‘some departments run numerous training sessions throughout the seat, whereas others run one at the beginning and not much else’ laments one trainee. Additionally, unclear policies and procedures surrounding seat moves and secondments were lambasted by a handful of trainees. Aside from that, the firm was looked on favourably for the ‘ample CSR opportunities’ – one trainee mentioned ‘taking part in a charity CSR trip to Romania’. If you want ‘responsibility, interesting work and independence’, Addleshaw Goddard may be the firm for you.


 A day in the life of...

valentine nguhi

Valentine Nguhi second seat trainee, Addleshaw Goddard LLP 

Departments to date:  Banking and IPE (infrastructure, projects and energy)


University:University of Leicester  
Degree:History with a year abroad 2(1) 


8.30am:  I arrive in the office and grab some breakfast from the Hub, our office cafĂ©. I usually have my breakfast while going through my emails and updating my to-do list. I try and write a to-do list at the end of each day and therefore, I might need to reprioritise depending on what emails I have received overnight.

9.00am:  My first task is to review two service agreements I was helping amend yesterday following client comments. Once reviewed, I send them to my supervisor. With IPE, there is plenty of opportunity to develop drafting skills and a trainee can find themselves being responsible for undertaking the first draft of key documents and being responsible for amending as needed following client and third party comments.

10.00am:  Next, I move on to finalising some engagement letters on a new matter involving the electricity transmission system. I will be helping a team member with reviewing the relevant agreement documents, therefore this gives me a chance to get to know the background of the matter and also complete the necessary administrative steps required for setting up and managing a matter.

11.00am:  I am part of our office’s charity committee and this morning we have a meeting. We have just started our new partnership with NSPCC Leeds and so the meeting involves planning the event calendar for the next few months. An associate in my team and I are organising a sports day and we take the opportunity to update the committee on what has already been planned and what is still outstanding.

12.00pm:  Back at my desk, I catch up with emails. My supervisor has reverted back on the service agreements and these can now be sent to the client. I am helping a team member with a pitch and therefore, take the next few minutes to read the documents sent over before heading down to our client floor for lunch. Our firm is hosting a group of sixth form students for the day and a group of us have been invited to lunch to meet them. The event is in partnership with the charity Through the Looking Glass which runs work experience opportunities for students from non-traditional backgrounds and today they are participating in some skills workshops at the firm.

1.30pm:  Back at my desk, I circulate a to-do list relating to the pitch I am helping with and action several steps on the matter. I then turn my attention to a research note I am doing on combined authorities and development corporations. Being part of the IPE team means that no two days are the same. I have had the opportunity to contribute to matters that span the energy and transport sector and which cover national and international clients and concerns.

6.00pm:  I finish off my day with creating tomorrow’s to-do-list. I leave in good time to meet some friends at a nearby bar.


About the firm

Address:Milton Gate, 60 Chiswell Street, London, EC1Y 4AG

Telephone: 020 7606 8855

Website:www.addleshawgoddard.com

Email:grad@addleshawgoddard.com

Facebook:@addleshawgoddardgraduates

Twitter:@AGgrads

Senior partner:  Charles Penney

Managing partner:  John Joyce

Other offices: Aberdeen, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, Manchester, Dubai, Hong Kong, Oman, Qatar and Singapore. 

Who we are: Addleshaw Goddard is a premium international law firm with an exceptional breadth of services. Our reputation for outstanding quality and service is built upon long-term relationship investment and a deep understanding of client markets combined with high-calibre expertise, straight-talking advice and a collaborative team culture.

What we do: The firm’s client portfolio is testament to its strength and range of expertise, and includes financial institutions, public sector bodies, successful businesses and private individuals. It is a leading advisor to FTSE 100 companies, and a market leader across its business divisions – corporate and commercial, finance and projects, litigation and real estate – as well as in specialist fields such as private capital, and across its chosen sectors: digital, energy and utilities, financial services, health, industrials, real estate, retail and consumer, transport.

What we are looking for: We require ABB at A Level and 2(1) at degree (or equivalent). We are also looking for candidates who can demonstrate commercial awareness, teamwork, motivation and drive. Applications from law and non-law graduates are welcomed, as are applications from those who may be considering a change of direction.

What you'll do:As a trainee, you’ll work on everything from multimillion-pound banking deals and cross-border mergers and acquisitions to the most high-profile fraud cases, complex technology contracts, employment disputes and transformational construction assignments. During each six-month seat, there will be regular two-way performance reviews with the supervising partner or solicitor.

Perks: We provide all trainees with a substantial and competitive range of benefits. These include: dental cover, gym allowance, season ticket loan, interest-free loan, bonus scheme, group pension membership with matched contributions at 3-5%, life insurance, permanent health insurance and private medical insurance.

Sponsorship:GDL/LPC and maintenance grant of ÂŁ7,000 (London), ÂŁ4,500 (other UK locations).

 


Facts and figures

Total partners: 239

Other fee-earners:785

Total trainees:99

Trainee places available for 2021: 46

Salary

First year: ÂŁ39,500 (London); ÂŁ27,000 (Leeds and Manchester); Scotland ÂŁ21,500

Second year: ÂŁ42,500 (London); ÂŁ29,000 (Leeds and Manchester); Scotland ÂŁ25,000

Newly qualified: ÂŁ70,000 (London); ÂŁ43,000 (Leeds and Manchester); ÂŁ38,000 (Scotland)



 Application process

How: Apply online

What's involved:Online application, video interview and assessment centre.

When to apply:

Training contract: By 31 July 2019

Spring vacation scheme: By 6 January 2019

Summer vacation scheme: By 6 January 2019

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