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Lloyds PR Solicitors

11 STATION ROAD, LONDON, NW10 4UJ, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0208 963 1050
Fax:
Fax 0208 963 1975
DX:
57654 HARLESDEN
Email:
Web:
www.lloydspr.com
London, Watford

Lloyds PR Solicitors is a leading criminal defence firm specialising in fraud and white-collar crime, with offices based in London and Hertfordshire. The firm handles serious and complex cases, including conspiracies and large-scale money laundering.

The firm: Lloyds PR Solicitors has developed a reputation for extensive legal knowledge, sharp tactical awareness and excellent client care. It is authorised to deal with very high cost cases and its staff include many who have been recognised for their talent in The Legal 500: partners Harsha Rupasinghe (solicitor) and Manoj Rupasighe (barrister), and Mohsin Ariff (solicitor).

The firm often handles cases that are international in scope such as €Operation Lait', concerning a £44m banking fraud investigated by the FBI and the Metropolitan Police. In R v W the firm represented a defendant in a ten-handed conspiracy in which the prosecution alleged they were selling khat to individuals in the US in order to fund an Islamic terrorist group in Somalia. This case was investigated by the Department of Homeland Security in the US and the Metropolitan Police.

The firm's solicitors and team of in-house counsel, led by Manoj Rupasinghe, are able to provide high quality representation at all stages of proceedings.

Areas of work undertaken: Serious and general crime: Lloyds PR Solicitors provides representation at police stations, magistrates' courts and the Crown Court in serious and general crime cases.

The firm enjoys a wealth of experience in dealing with serious criminal cases, such as those involving allegations of murder, drug importation, armed robberies and conspiracies. Examples of some of the cases it has worked on: 'Operation Jardim', high-profile investigation into the murder of Sabrina Moss; 'Operation Netwing', a widely publicised case involving allegations of slavery and forced labour; and R v Beyene [2010], a high-profile robbery of gemstones worth £40m from Graff (the jewellers) on New Bond Street in 2009.

Fraud and white-collar crime: one of Lloyds PR Solicitors€™ key strengths is its ability to assimilate large volumes of complex material and undertake forensic accountancy analysis, in order to reduce its clients' liabilities.

Examples of some of the cases it has worked on: Operation Daniel', a ten-handed pharmaceutical fraud and money laundering case valued at over £10m; Operation Prelacy, a £179m money service business fraud investigated by the SOCA; and €'Operation Veneer', £150m money service business fraud.

Money laundering and regulatory work: Lloyds PR Solicitors has a regulatory department specifically aimed at the money service businesses and the foreign exchange market by providing advice on compliance and money laundering.

Asset restraint and confiscation: Lloyds PR Solicitors has expertise and extensive experience in cash forfeiture, restraint order, confiscation and civil recovery proceedings, which often run alongside or after criminal cases. The firm regularly represents contesting sums of several million pounds. In ¬Ä¬ėOperation Prelacy¬Ä¬ô, it is contesting a confiscation figure in excess of ¬£192m, the second largest confiscation order sought to date.

Extradition: the extradition team at Lloyds PR Solicitors is led by Harsha Rupasinghe, a member of the Extradition Lawyers Association, who specialises in extradition and mutual assistance.

Judicial review: Lloyds PR Solicitors represents clients in judicial review cases born out of criminal proceedings. Its successes have led to changes in the law: see R (Dyer) v Watford Magistrates' Court [2013] ACD 47.

  • Number of UK partners: 3
  • Number of other UK fee-earners: 40
  • Breakdown of work %
  • ‚Ä©
  • Serious fraud and white-collar crime: 40
  • Crime: 40
  • Confiscation, civil recovery and cash forfeiture: 15
  • Regulatory: 5

‚Ä©

  • Languages
  • English
  • Arabic
  • Italian
  • Polish
  • Russian
  • Lithuanian
  • Singhalese
  • Hindu
  • Member
  • Law Society of England and Wales

Above material supplied by Lloyds PR Solicitors.

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