The Legal 500

Twitter Logo Youtube Circle Icon LinkedIn Icon

Shakespeare Martineau LLP

NO 1 COLMORE SQUARE, BIRMINGHAM, B4 6AA, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 0121 214 0000
Fax:
Fax 0121 237 3011
Email:
Web:
www.shma.co.uk

Shakespeare Martineau is a Top 50 law firm in the Midlands, strong in London, and connected globally. We have offices in Birmingham, Leicester, London, Milton Keynes, Nottingham, Sheffield, Solihull and Stratford-upon-Avon.

We bring creativity, commerciality and clarity to complex challenges. We have big ambitions and work with blue-chip companies, leading organisations, high street brands and individuals across the world.

Our approach is to think beyond just legal solutions. As long-term partners, clients continually trust us to advise on what’s possible, what’s prudent, and what’s coming around the corner.

We pride ourselves on protecting and growing our clients’ businesses and personal wealth. It’s our energy and entrepreneurial flair that have helped us become one of the country’s fastest growing legal services providers, our national presence through our geographic footprint provides us with a broad and deep market insight.

Types of work undertaken

Banking and finance: the firm advises banks and other lenders on funding corporate or property transactions, and transactional expertise includes turnarounds, administrations, contentious insolvency work and directors’ disqualification work. The banking litigation team provide solutions on security enforcement, fraud, recovery of funds, moveable assets and receivables.

Commercial contracts: the firm advises organisations at all levels of the procurement and supply chain. A number of the team have worked as in-house counsel.

Commercial property: the real estate team deals with the full spectrum of development, regeneration, investment, asset management, landlord and tenant, sales and purchases, finance, Islamic finance, and litigation. The team has particular expertise in housebuilding and acts for some of the UK’s foremost residential developers.

Construction: the firm’s construction lawyers advise pre- and post-execution of contract.

Corporate: known for its hands-on commercial approach, the team guides clients to complete transactions, notably for listed, employee-owned and family businesses.

Debt recovery: the team manages volume ledger collect-outs on behalf of major banks, finance institutions and insolvency practitioners and negotiates with defendant companies for high-value settlements in attempts to avoid litigation.

Dispute resolution and litigation: the firm acts for claimant and defendant clients, specialising in complex and high-value commercial disputes, including arbitration and alternative dispute resolution.

Education: the firm’s integrated education experts advise on contracts, employment, business defence, regulatory compliance, property and handle student complaints.

Employment: the firm provides commercial, practical advice to employers and some senior employees on all aspects of contentious and non-contentious employment law.

Energy: the team supports utilities, developers and funders, advising on the energy landscape.

Family: the specialist family unit offers legal expertise and practical advice to ensure financial security for clients, dealing with matters swiftly, amicably and cost effectively.

Intellectual property: the IP team provides contentious and non-contentious advice in relation to all aspects of IP law, including protecting technology, designs, names and reputation.

Investment funds: the multidisciplinary team acts for investment funds managers, investors and the companies they support, advising on fund operation, transactions, investments and tax legislation.

Personal injury (defendant): the insurance litigation team offers services to insurers, adjusters, brokers, public utilities, local authorities, composites and the self-insured. It has particular expertise in high-value claims including dealing with large loss and catastrophic injury claims. The team also

offers advice on costs-only technical issues for insurers.

Planning: the firm’s experts work with developers, housebuilders, landowners, local authorities, retailers and private individuals on all types of development, wider planning and public law issues.

Social housing: the team advises registered providers on everything including buying land, managing tenancy relationships, employing people, raising private finance and delivering extra care schemes.

Tax, trusts and inheritance: the team advises on all legal, taxation and financial matters, as well as liaising with private bank and investment advisors and dealing with asset protection issues.

  • Number of UK partners: 125
  • Number of employees: 850

Above material supplied by Shakespeare Martineau LLP.

Legal Developments in the UK

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • Court of Justice rules on source of income for Derivative Residence applications

    On 2 October 2019, the Court of Justice delivered its judgment in Bajratari v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Directive 2004/38/EC) Case C-93/18 which concerns Chen applications and the source of funds for self-sufficiency. 
  • End of the ‘centre of life test’ in Surinder Singh cases?

    In the recent case of  ZA (Reg 9. EEA Regs; abuse of rights) Afghanistan   [2019] UKUT 281 (IAC ), the Upper Tribunal found that there is no basis in EU law for the centre of life test, as set out in Regulation 9(3)(a) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (the “Regulations”). It further found that it is not to be applied when Judges assess  Surinder Singh  cases that appear before them.
  • Terms of employment as a sole representative

    In this article we examine the working arrangements of sole representatives, looking at the terms and conditions of employment that the Home Office will expect a sole representative to have in order to qualify as a representative of an overseas business.  
  • Can Sole Representatives Be Shareholders?

    The Immigration Rules require that an applicant for a  sole representative visa  is not “a  majority shareholder in the overseas business”.
  • Immigration Skills Charge - A Guide for Employers

    As a Sponsor, you may be required to pay the Immigration Skills Charge (ISC) each time you sponsor a migrant in the  Tier 2 General  or  Intra-Company Transfer (ICT) Long-term Staff  subcategory.
  • 5 FAQS about paragraph 320(11)

    In applications for entry clearance where the applicant has a negative immigration history in the UK, the application may be refused under the general grounds for refusal, which are found in part 9 of the Immigration Rules. Where an applicant has  ‘previously contrived in a significant way to frustrate the intentions of the Immigration Rules’,  the application could be refused under paragraph 320(11). In this post we look at five frequently asked questions about paragraph 320(11). 
  • Multiple nationality and multiple citizenship (including dual nationality and dual citizenship)

    British nationality law permits multiple nationality and multiple citizenship, including dual nationality and dual citizenship.
  • Applying for Indefinite Leave to Remain in the Exceptional Talent or Promise Category

    The  Exceptional Talent  and Exceptional Promise categories are for individuals who are recognised leaders or emerging leaders in their field of expertise. There are a number of endorsing bodies for lots of different fields of work, including  artists and musicians ,  architects ,  digital experts ,  scientists  and  academics . While there isn’t an endorsing body for every expert, the growing list means that many individuals could enjoy the flexibility that this category has to offer. 
  • PARALLEL PROCEEDINGS – CIVIL AND CRIMINAL

    Syedur Rahmanconsiders the factors that determine when civil proceedings can go ahead before,or at the same time as, criminal proceedings relating to the same circumstances.
  • Rights of appeal after the Immigration Act 2014

    The Immigration Act 2014 (“the 2014 Act”) reduced the circumstances in which the refusal of an immigration application will give rise to a right of appeal. The  explanatory notes  to the 2014 Act state that the Act was intended to restructure rights of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal. Previously, a right of appeal to the Immigration Tribunal existed against any of the 14 different immigration decisions listed in s.82 of the  Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002  (“the 2002 Act”). As explained below, whether or not the refusal of an immigration application currently generates a right of appeal depends on the subject matter of the application rather than its categorisation.