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BTO Solicitors LLP

Work 0141 221 8012
Fax 0141 221 7803
Edinburgh, Glasgow

Caroline Carr

Work 0141 221 8012
BTO Solicitors LLP

Work Department



Partner and head of BTO’s employment team

Partner and head of BTO’s employment team, Caroline is accredited by the Law Society of Scotland as a Specialist in Employment Law. Advises a range of employers and senior executives on full spectrum of employment law issues including disciplinary issues, managing exits, whistleblowing and discrimination claims and negotiating high level Settlement Agreements. Acts for the insured of global insurers under their employment practices liability insurance. Also works closely with commercial and corporate colleagues advising on employment aspects of acquisitions and business transfers (TUPE) and in regulatory/corporate governance matters involving directors/Board members and reporting to the various Regulators. Successfully represents clients at Employment Tribunals and Employment Appeal Tribunals throughout the UK. Expertise in advising doctors, consultants and dentists experiencing employment and disciplinary difficulties, which can significantly impact on their professional reputation, through representing the interests of members of various medical and dental defence organisations in regulatory disciplinary matters.


Partner and Head of Employment Law team, BTO Solicitors LLP (2000 - present); Law Society of Scotland Accredited Specialist (since 2001); Associate, BTO Solicitors (1997–2000); Tindal Oatts (1993-97).


Law Society of Scotland’s Employment Law Group.


St Brides, East Kilbride; Glasgow University (1991 LLB Hons Dip LP).


Tennis, golf and travel.

Scotland: Human resources


Within: Employment

Acting for employers and employees alike, BTO Solicitors LLP is ‘a very good choice for medium-sized companies’ and ‘provides excellent service, from general advice to tribunal representation’. The team handles whistleblowing, discrimination and TUPE matters and often acts for public sector clients as well as colleges, private schools and senior executives. The ‘very organised and knowledgeableLaura Salmond, who ‘approaches conflicts with a calm demeanour and incisive wit’, advised more than 3,000 members of the Prison Officers’ Association Scotland on a wide range of employment matters, including discrimination, capability, misconduct and data protection issues. Practice head Caroline Carr is best known for her expertise in the clinical defence arena and frequently advises doctors, consultants and dentists on employment and disciplinary issues. Her recent highlights include advising a doctor on investigation proceedings. In another highlight, the team advised a Scottish group of companies on TUPE transfer matters. The ‘very responsive’ David Hoey is also recommended, as is consultant Rhona Wark, who joined from Anderson Strathern.

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Scotland: Real estate

Social housing

Within: Social housing

BTO Solicitors LLP has a track record in the social housing sector dating back to the 1970s, and is particularly known for acting for RSLs. Patrice Fabien leads the group, which includes commercial conveyancing expert Karen Brodie. Brodie acted alongside Marieclaire Reid and Lesley Gray for Clyde Valley Housing Association on its acquisition of 13 separate development sites as part of an ambitious development programme. Grant Hunter assists with all forms of dispute resolution (including litigation, arbitration and mediation), and is experienced in contentious matters arising from development projects and tenement refurbishment programmes. David Young handles a variety of issues, such as antisocial behaviour, tenancy litigation and factoring. Also recommended are employment law specialists Caroline Carr and David Hoey, construction law expert Sandra Cassels, and Paul Motion, who is advising Oak Tree Housing Association on the data protection aspects of the Common Housing Register. Kingdom Housing Association, Partick Housing Association and Grampian Housing Association are also clients.

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