The Legal 500

Twitter Logo Youtube Circle Icon LinkedIn Icon

Stephenson Harwood

18/F, UNITED CENTRE, 95 QUEENSWAY, HONG KONG
Tel:
Work +852 2868 0789
Fax:
Fax +852 2868 1504
Email:
Web:
www.shlegal.com
Beijing, Dubai, Hong Kong, London, Paris, Piraeus and 4 more

Jonathan Chu

Tel:
Work +852 3166 6925
Email:
Web:
www.shlegal.com/people/jonathan-chu
Stephenson Harwood

Position

Partner

Career

Jonathan is an intellectual property lawyer with a complete IP practice ranging from advising on transactions, to worldwide prosecution of IP rights, to IP litigation and enforcement strategies in Hong Kong and China.  He is also active in the fintech and blockchain spaces.

With over a decade of experience, Jonathan has advised a wide array of leading companies in industries including life sciences, fashion, toys and games, consumer goods, hospitality, TMT, TCM, entertainment, aviation, and energy, amongst others.

Based in Hong Kong, and often working through Stephenson Harwood’s various Greater China offices, Jonathan is regularly sought out by clients as their go-to legal counsel to guide them through their regional contentious and non-contentious legal matters.  He regularly advises clients in local and cross-border intellectual property strategies including anti-counterfeiting, customs seizures, IP rights enforcement, technology transfer, co-development projects, and application/registration and commercialisation of all types intellectual property rights.  Jonathan’s practice also extends to advising clients on a variety of matters related to their businesses including commercial agreements, complex litigation, IP due diligence, and data privacy.

Jonathan is well recognised for both his enforcement and transaction expertise, being called “truly a master in enforcement and IP transactions”.  He was recently named as one of Asia’s 40 under 40 outstanding legal professionals in the region, and is ranked in leading international publications.

Languages

English, Mandarin, Cantonese


China: Fintech

Fintech: foreign firms

Within: Fintech: foreign firms

Exhibiting a wide range of expertise, Stephenson Harwood's team advised a Chinese e-commerce company on the compliance and regulatory matters related to its B2C e-commerce platform and represented All In Pay Network Services, a Chinese third-party payment service company on its opposition of UnionPay's trade mark application. Financial services specialist Mark Reed is advising a licensed money lender in connection with the structuring, setting up and operation of a P2P secured lending platform, Ivan Tan handled an initial coin offering transaction, and Jane Ng assisted TNG (Global) with the series A financing made by New Margin Capital. IP specialist Jonathan Chu is also a name to note.

[back to top]

Hong Kong

Intellectual property

Within: Intellectual property

Leveraging a strong presence on the ground in mainland China, Stephenson Harwood's two-partner Hong Kong team is well-equipped to represent local and international corporates on the prosecution and enforcement of IPR, in addition to handling commercial and corporate IP matters. Jonathan Chu is well-versed in handling work across the spectrum of contentious and non-contentious IP, often from a multi-jurisdictional perspective. Chu recently acted for US-based life sciences company Grail on the Hong Kong IP aspects of its acquisition of key IP owned by a Hong Kong team of leading researchers. Although she also handles a considerable amount of employment law work, Jezamine Fewins is also a formidable IP litigator; among her recent highlights has been defending Henriette Joop's revocation application in respect of its JJ trademark for perfumes. Leveraging her employment law expertise, Fewins also has a particular specialty in representing clients in matters that involve the theft of trade secrets and confidential information by employees.

[back to top]


Back to index

Legal Developments by:
Stephenson Harwood

  • Companies should plan now to minimise their pension protection levy

    The amount that pension schemes have to pay to the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) for the year 2006/07 may have increased by as much as five times the previous year's levy. Employers who ultimately bear the cost of many pension schemes will need to make plans now to ensure the levy payable for the year 2008/09 is kept to a minimum.
    - Stephenson Harwood

Legal Developments in Hong Kong

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to