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Stephenson Harwood

Living Wage
1 FINSBURY CIRCUS, LONDON, EC2M 7SH, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7329 4422
Fax:
Fax 020 7329 7100
DX:
64 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Email:
Web:
www.shlegal.com
Beijing, Dubai, Hong Kong, London, Paris, Piraeus and 4 more

Stephenson Harwood is a law firm with over 1,000 people worldwide, including more than 170 partners. Its people are committed to achieving the goals of its clients - listed and private companies, institutions and individuals.

The firm: Stephenson Harwood assembles teams of bright thinkers to match its clients' needs and give the right advice from the right person at the right time. Dedicating the highest calibre of legal talent to overcome the most complex issues, the firm delivers pragmatic, expert advice that is set squarely in the real world.

The firm is headquartered in London, with ten offices across Asia, Europe and the Middle East. In addition, the firm has forged close ties with other high-quality law firms. This diverse mix of expertise and culture results in a combination of deep local insight, and the capability to provide a seamless international service.

Types of work undertaken: Stephenson Harwood has recognised market-leading strengths in five key areas: asset finance, commercial litigation and arbitration, corporate finance, marine and international trade, and real estate. Its offering is underpinned by in-depth market knowledge related to all of these areas, backed by a full range of ancillary legal services attuned to the needs of clients within each area.

Asset finance: the team's expertise covers a very broad range of assets that includes aviation, heavy equipment, rail, oil and gas, ports and airports, real estate, renewables and shipping. Clients include global and domestic lenders, arrangers, sponsors and borrowers.

Commercial litigation, arbitration and regulation: the team has a track record for advising clients on their most challenging disputes and has, over the years, acted on many of the largest cases in the commercial courts. The team is highly respected among its peers. In addition to the firm's own clients, Stephenson Harwood is frequently referred work by many of the largest international law firms when they are faced with conflict situations.

Corporate finance: the team's core services include M&A, takeovers, joint ventures, IPOs, private equity and venture capital. The client base is international and includes listed and privately-owned companies, management teams, banks and private equity houses. The team operates across a broad range of industries, but has a particularly strong track record in the consumer, energy and resources, financial services, pharmaceuticals and transportation sectors.

Marine and international trade: the size of the team and depth of its experience mean that Stephenson Harwood is well placed to advise on any shipping or trade-related concern ‚Äď from the most complex marine incident or financing structure to the more straightforward sale and purchase dispute or cargo claim. Clients include many of the world's largest ship owners, ship yards, banks, insurers, P&I clubs, offshore services companies and commodity traders.

Real estate: the team advises on investment acquisitions and disposals, financings, development projects, sale and leasebacks and other structures, as well as ongoing property management matters. It has extensive experience of real estate development and regeneration, securing planning permissions and advising on environmental issues. Clients include property companies, institutional investors and financiers, fund managers, high-net-worth individuals, hotel groups and corporate occupiers.

Other practice areas: banking, commercial, contentious trusts, employment, environment, funds, intellectual property, pensions, projects, restructuring and insolvency, tax and private wealth.

Other offices: Beijing, Dubai, Hong Kong, Paris, Piraeus, Seoul, Shanghai, Singapore, Yangon.

Associated offices: Athens, Bucharest, Guangzhou, Jakarta.

  • Number of UK partners: 170
  • Number of other UK fee-earners: 675

Above material supplied by Stephenson Harwood.

Legal Developments by:
Stephenson Harwood

  • Companies should plan now to minimise their pension protection levy

    The amount that pension schemes have to pay to the Pension Protection Fund (PPF) for the year 2006/07 may have increased by as much as five times the previous year's levy. Employers who ultimately bear the cost of many pension schemes will need to make plans now to ensure the levy payable for the year 2008/09 is kept to a minimum.
    - Stephenson Harwood

Legal Developments in the UK

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