The Legal 500

Twitter Logo Youtube Circle Icon LinkedIn Icon

Anthony Harper

LEVEL 6, CHORUS HOUSE, 66 WYNDHAM STREET, AUCKLAND 1140, NEW ZEALAND
Tel:
Work +64 9 920 6400
Fax:
Fax +64 9 920 9599
Email:
Web:
www.anthonyharper.co.nz
Auckland, Christchurch

Karen Kemp

Tel:
Work 09 920 6466
Email:
Anthony Harper

Work Department

Litigation and Construction

Position

Partner - Litigation

Career

Karen specialises in commercial litigation, advising clients on a wide range of disputes and risk management.

She has extensive experience acting for national and international clients in corporate disputes, construction and property litigation, debt collection and issues relating to regulatory compliance and insurance.

Karen is a smart commercial thinker, always pragmatic, using her experience to provide strategic advice to get the best result for you. Whether it is a multi-million dollar construction claim, an adjudication or a shareholder dispute, Karen's expertise will be focused on your interests and outcomes. She acts for small land owners, large off-shore finance houses, contractors, principals, gaming societies and corporate stakeholders. She recently brought the first application to put a Body Corporate into liquidation.

Karen has appeared as counsel in the High Court, District Court and Tribunals, as well as advising clients on complex investigations by the Department of Internal Affairs or acting in judicial review proceedings.

Karen is recommended in the 2016 Asia Pacific Legal 500 Directory.

Languages

English

Member

National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC)

Education

Cambridge University BA (Hons), MA (Cantab) Postgraduate Diploma in Legal Practice (UK)


New Zealand

Dispute resolution

Within: Dispute resolution

Anthony Harper continued to grow its dispute resolution team, which is led by Christchurch-based Peter Woods. The firm is recognised for its strong track record in complex cases, including contractual disputes, breach of trust and fiduciary duty claims, governance disputes and urgent interlocutory relief applications. The addition of Katherine Anderson, formerly director of legal and risk at Auckland Council and a current member of the Human Rights Review Tribunal, to the Auckland team gives the firm significant weight in public law matters. Her arrival also brought new clients Auckland Council and Auckland Transport to the firm. Karen Kemp, who acts for homeowners’ organisation HOBANZ, and Dan Hughes are also recommended, as is Richard Smedley in Christchurch. Woods is acting for EQC Action Group in a High Court action against the Earthquake Commission concerning statutory standards for building repair. Hughes assisted First Credit Union lodge with a complaint challenging the NZ Association of Credit Unions’ rules.

[back to top]


Back to index

Legal Developments in New Zealand

Legal Developments and updates from the leading lawyers in each jurisdiction. To contribute, send an email request to
  • The Tax Working Group’s Interim Report - A capital gains tax for New Zealand?

    ​​​​​​The Tax Working Group has released its Interim Report on the Future of Tax. Amongst a number of other matters, the Interim Report describes two alternative methods for the implementation of a capital gains tax in New Zealand, which will be the subject of further consideration over the coming months. 
  • Privilege in regulatory investigations: UK Court of Appeal supports a broad approach

    Last week, the UK Court of Appeal released its much-anticipated judgment in ENRC v SFO[1], a decision with significant implications for the scope of legal professional privilege in the context of regulatory investigations.
  • Overseas Investment - review announced just as new regime comes into force

    Just days before amendments to New Zealand’s overseas investment regime take effect, the government has announced its intention to undertake a further review of the legislation.
  • New NZX Listing Rules in force from 1 January 2019

    NZX today published the final version of its updated listing rules. These new rules will take effect on 1 January 2019, subject to a six-month transition period.
  • Trans-Pacific Partnership trade benefits are coming

    Following several years of negotiations, and after the high-profile collapse of the original Trans-Pacific Partnership ( TPP ) in 2017, the renamed “Comprehensive and Progressive Trans-Pacific Partnership” ( CPTPP ) has now met the required number of ratifications to come into force. This is due to occur on 30 December 2018. This will offer New Zealand businesses a range of opportunities they should plan for, including reduced tariffs on a number of key exports.​
  • CPTPP Agreement sparks further legislative change

    The Government has introduced further amendments to the Overseas Investment Regulations 2005 (the Regulations ) to ensure New Zealand complies with its obligations under the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (the CPTPP Agreement ) and various other international agreements New Zealand is a party to.
  • What is the latest in privacy law reform?

    The Overseas Investment Amendment Bill (the Bill) was passed yesterday after its third and final reading. It is likely to receive Royal assent this month. Once that occurs, the provisions of the Bill that limit the ability of overseas persons to purchase residential property in New Zealand and the changes in the regime governing overseas investments in forestry will officially become part of the Overseas Investment Act (the Act).
  • Residential land amendments mark new era in New Zealand’s overseas investment regime

    ​​​​​​The Overseas Investment Amendment Bill (the Bill) was passed yesterday after its third and final reading. It is likely to receive Royal assent this month. Once that occurs, the provisions of the Bill that limit the ability of overseas persons to purchase residential property in New Zealand and the changes in the regime governing overseas investments in forestry will officially become part of the Overseas Investment Act (the Act).
  • A fresh look at the recoverability of takeover expenses

    The High Court has revisited the recoverability of a target company's expenses for the first time in more than 45 years. The case has important implications for future reimbursement disputes.
  • Insurance contract law reform back on the agenda for 2018

    The Government announced on 6 March that it is undertaking a review of New Zealand's insurance contract law, and has released a terms of reference for the review here ​​.