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CEDR CHAMBERS, CENTRE FOR EFFECTIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTON, 70 FLEET STREET, LONDON, EC4Y 1EU, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7536 6000
Fax:
Fax 020 7536 6001
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Top-tier Firm rankings


London: Dispute resolution

Mediators
Mediators - ranked: tier 2

Christopher Newmark - CEDR Chambers

Tim Hardy - CEDR Chambers

Nick Pearson - CEDR Chambers

Eve Pienaar - CEDR Chambers

Eileen Carroll QC (Hon) - CEDR Chambers

Tony Allen - CEDR Chambers

Caroline Sheridan - CEDR Chambers

Dr Karl Mackie CBE - CEDR Chambers

Neil Goodrum - CEDR Chambers

Stephen Bate - CEDR Chambers

Formerly at 5RB, CEDR Chambers' Stephen Bate's 'grasp of detail and his ability to mediate pleasantly and persuasively between parties who could not be further apart are the main contributory factors to the success of his mediations'. Bate recently mediated matters involving sectors such as media and entertainment, healthcare, sport and banking as well as partnership and shareholder disputes.

Also a partner at specialist dispute resolution law firm Spenser Underhill Newmark LLP, CEDR Chambers' Christopher Newmark is 'hugely experienced and deserving of his reputation. Meticulous and bringing the right level of touch to the process, he is also good at judging when to put pressure on parties and effectively follows up'. Newmark has mediated over 200 cases; he specialises in large commercial disputes and is particularly well known for mediating in the IT and telecoms sectors and in international cases where arbitration proceedings are pending or may be issued.

CEDR Chambers' Caroline Sheridan 'successfully resolves problems and is down to earth yet professional and knowledgeable; she also quickly identifies problems and remembers all the facts clients bombard her with and suggests excellent ways to reach resolution'. Sheridan has mediated hundreds of workplace-related cases; recently she mediated a dispute that arose from an appraisal grade given by a manager.

CEDR Chambers' Tim Hardy is CMS' former commercial litigaition head. Hardy is 'very effective; he shows skill, intelligence, common sense and patience in dealing with very tricky and challenging situations'. His mediation experience predominantly arises out of corporate transactions, finance and commercial contracts. Hardy also mediates at In Place of Strife, The Mediation Chambers .

CEDR Chambers’ Nick Pearson's 'style is calm and he quickly builds up trust'. Pearson has acted as mediator, both in the UK and abroad, in over 300 commercial mediations, including multi-party claims; his 2017 disputes involved professional negligence, wills, trusts and probate, employment and partnership claims as well as breach of contract, shareholder disputes, insolvency, and banking and financial services. Pearson mediated a claim for misfeasance by a liquidator against the administrator of an insolvent company, who allegedly negligently carried out a sale of the company’s assets and failed to protect the company’s assets.

CEDR Chambers' principal mediator Eileen Carroll QC (Hon) 'has an excellent manner and proves particularly effective in dealing with banking customers who are distressed or particularly in need of reassurance; and her careful case analysis coupled with a reassuring manner help produce excellent settlements'. Spending over 200 days mediating in 2017, Carroll is one of the most requested mediators on CEDR Chambers' global panel of 200 mediators. Representative work includes the resolution of highly complex multi-party disputes in financial services (including banking and insurance), IT and telecoms, and the public sector; she has also mediated matters involving property, employment, infrastructure, pensions, partnerships and IP. Recent highlights include a commercial contract mediation resulting from various disputes between a Central European company and its London-based parent company, which arose in relation to an outsourcing services agreement for analytical services; a longstanding IP matter involving distribution agreements and the breakdown of a joint venture; and claims in relation to the provisions of engineering services for the design, engineering, procurement, construction testing, and commissioning of a carbon steel pipeline.

CEDR Chambers' principal mediator Eileen Carroll QC (Hon) 'has an excellent manner and proves particularly effective in dealing with banking customers who are distressed or particularly in need of reassurance; and her careful case analysis coupled with a reassuring manner help produce excellent settlements'. Spending over 200 days mediating in 2017, Carroll is one of the most requested mediators on CEDR Chambers' global panel of 200 mediators. Representative work includes the resolution of highly complex multi-party disputes in financial services (including banking and insurance), IT and telecoms, and the public sector; she has also mediated matters involving property, employment, infrastructure, pensions, partnerships and IP. Recent highlights include a commercial contract mediation resulting from various disputes between a Central European company and its London-based parent company, which arose in relation to an outsourcing services agreement for analytical services; a longstanding IP matter involving distribution agreements and the breakdown of a joint venture; and claims in relation to the provisions of engineering services for the design, engineering, procurement, construction testing, and commissioning of a carbon steel pipeline.

CEDR Chambers’ Tony Allen is 'particularly valued for his measured and careful approach when dealing with sensitive issues; he creates an atmosphere where he can be trusted to assist the parties without the fear of pressure to come to a compromise just to achieve settlement'. Allen now  almost exclusively specialises in clinical negligence and personal injury mediation; in 2018 he mediated a right to life case concerning a child.

Dr Karl Mackie CBE of CEDR Chambers 'has emotional intelligence and quickly appreciates the dynamics between the parties, while his calm and understated manner quickly engenders trust with the parties; he is also approachable, rigorous and determined to achieve a settlement if at all possible'. Mackie's experience ranges from leading complex class actions and multi-party disputes, to handling commercial and regulatory disputes with national and international implications; his recent work includes international commercial disputes, professional negligence, engineering and energy, technology, and healthcare. Other areas include partnerships, family businesses, finance and banking, insurance, insolvency, joint ventures, property and media. Recent highlights include acting in a dispute involving large technology companies that wished to adopt new technology for mobile phone networks; the claim was for an alleged failure of software and services. He also mediated a partnership breakup, including a claim for part of the sales price and subsequent dividends on sales.

Formerly an equity partner at McCormicks (where he remains a consultant), CEDR Chambers' Neil Goodrum 'remains unflappably calm even in the face of seemingly intractable positions taken by parties; he continues to question and probe and eventually excellent results are achieved'. Goodrum recently mediated a dispute involving a personal injury claim for psychiatric injury sustained during employment; and assisted with an agency fee dispute between a professional sportsman and his former agent.

At CEDR Chambers, Eve Pienaar's 'approach is 'professional, practical and fair; she communicates to parties very clearly and clients feel comfortable speaking to her and voicing their views in cases'. With specialist experience in property and construction disputes, Pienaar mediates cases involving public sector utilities, probate and partnership disputes.

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