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20 CURSITOR STREET, LONDON, EC4A 1LT, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7831 9222
Fax:
Fax 020 7831 9607
DX:
138 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Web:
www.macfarlanes.com

Jonathan Arr

Tel:
Work 020 7831 9222
Email:
Macfarlanes LLP

Work Department

Litigation and dispute resolution

Position

Partner in the litigation group specialising in international contentious trust, probate and succession disputes, high-value family disputes and commercial litigation. The clients for whom he acts range from multinational corporations, international private wealth managers and trust companies through to a diverse spectrum of high-net-worth individuals both from the UK and from South America, Europe and the Middle East.


London: Private client

Contentious trusts and probate

Within: Next generation lawyers

Jonathan Arr - Macfarlanes LLP

Within: Contentious trusts and probate

Macfarlanes LLP ‘has a truly outstanding team from partner level to trainee level’. Charles Lloyd ‘conducts high-value and difficult litigation with charm, urbanity and intelligence’. The ‘organised, very determined and assured’ Jonathan Arr  ‘has established himself as a major presence in the sphere of international trust litigation’. The ‘impressivePiers Barclay , the ‘polished and incisive’ Matthew Pintus  (now a consultant) and the ‘hugely successful’ Simon Day (a senior solicitor) are also recommended. Clients of the ‘completely top-class and extremely professional team’ include beneficiaries, spouses, trustees, financial institutions, entrepreneurs and those with hereditary wealth and protectors. The group regularly deals with some of the largest trusts and estates that often hold prominent businesses, other substantial property holdings and large cash and investment portfolios.

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Legal Developments by:
Macfarlanes LLP

  • Finding the 
right words

    In the recent case of Newbury v Sun Microsystems [2013], the defendant argued that an offer to settle proceedings was ‘in principle' only and that a binding contract could not be formed until further terms had been agreed and a formal contract had been signed. It supported this argument by referring to a statement, in the offer letter, that the settlement was to be ‘recorded in a suitably worded agreement'. 

    - Macfarlanes

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