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20 CURSITOR STREET, LONDON, EC4A 1LT, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7831 9222
Fax:
Fax 020 7831 9607
DX:
138 LONDON CHANCERY LANE WC2
Web:
www.macfarlanes.com

Christopher Acton

Tel:
Work 020 7831 9222
Email:
Macfarlanes LLP

Work Department

Derivatives and trading.

Position

Partner in the derivatives and trading group, advising hedge funds and managed account platforms on prime brokerage, custody, repo, securities lending and margin financing matters, exchange traded and OTC derivatives and central clearing generally.

Career

Partner 2014.


London: Finance

Derivatives and structured products

Within: Derivatives and structured products

Macfarlanes LLP impresses by virtue of its 'in-depth knowledge of derivatives, quick and succinct answers delivered with a minimum of legalese, and terrific understanding of the commercial drivers on both buy and sell sides'. The firm has one of the leading buy-side practices and it continued to attract new clients including BlueDrive Global Investors, CG Asset Management and Seiga Asset Management last year, adding to a list that includes Man Group, Goldman Sachs and Marshall Wace. In a highlight matter, the firm acted for forex and commodities broker Sucden Financial on the creation of a new collateral netting agreement. Buy-side specialist Christopher Acton led that work and he frequently acts for hedge funds, managed account platforms and proprietary trading houses in prime brokerage, derivatives and regulatory matters in Europe. The 'smart, thoughtful and commercial' Will Sykes acts for investment and hedge funds, financial institutions, high-net-worth clients and corporates in financing and trading transactions, focusing on both derivatives and structured products. Senior counsel Rob Daniell 'brings years of sell-side prime brokerage experience to bear and his advice is prompt, clear and concise'.

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Legal Developments by:
Macfarlanes LLP

  • Finding the ‚Ä®right words

    In the recent case of Newbury v Sun Microsystems [2013], the defendant argued that an offer to settle proceedings was ‚Äėin principle' only and that a binding contract could not be formed until further terms had been agreed and a formal contract had been signed. It supported this argument by referring to a statement, in the offer letter, that the settlement was to be ‚Äėrecorded in a suitably worded agreement'. ‚Ä©
    - Macfarlanes

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