The Legal 500

Ledingham Chalmers LLP

JOHNSTONE HOUSE, 52-54 ROSE STREET, ABERDEEN, AB10 1HA, SCOTLAND
Tel:
Work 01224 408408
Fax:
Fax 01224 408400
DX:
AB15 ABERDEEN
Email:
Web:
www.ledinghamchalmers.com

Sarah Stuart

Tel:
Work 01224 408449
Email:
Ledingham Chalmers LLP

Work Department

Construction/litigation.

Position

Partner in construction unit (based within the litigation division). Concentrates on contentious and non-contentious construction work drawing on an understanding of the reasons why clients end up in disputes to assist in the drafting and negotiating of contracts and advising on resolving disputes before resorting to litigation. Represents clients in the construction industry and service companies in the oil and gas industry. Well acquainted with alternative methods of dispute resolution including adjudication particular to the construction industry, expert determination and mediation. Experience includes: advising on the building sub-contracts, including interfacing issues, (based on the Standard Schools Standard Contract) and consultant appointments under PPP projects; advising on and procuring the building contract and consultant appointments for a housing association for the construction of new housing stock; advising on the procurement of the building contract and consultant appointments, together with collateral warranties, novations and performance bonds for the construction of a commercial unit including advising on the interfacing issues with third party purchasers of the site and future tenants. Recent projects include; advising Marine Architects on potential claim arising in relation to design of fishing vessel; advising clients on contractual rights of retention (cross border issues) in relation to cranes built for fishing vessels; advising engineering sub-contractors in a dispute regarding design and construction of a blow-out preventer and the certification standards applicable to that; advising contractor on building contract and pass through risk in sub-contracts relating to a large accommodation project at a new petrochemical facility; advising clients in relation to intellectual property disputes in the Court of Session; advising and representing clients in relation to recovery of documents under Section 1 of the Administration of Justice (Scotland) Act; preparation and conduct on seminars for clients, construction industry bodies and organisations on general contract law and common disputes arising under the contracts (particularly construction contracts).

Career

Trained Peterkins, Aberdeen; qualified 1998, England and Wales 2005; solicitor 1998-2000; solicitor Ledingham Chalmers 2000-03; associate 2003-06; partner Ledingham Chalmers LLP 2006 to date. Director of Inspire Ventures Limited. Lectured in contract, delict and dispute resolution to undergraduate and postgraduate surveying students at The Robert Gordon University. DipLP Tutor in Arbitration at The University of Aberdeen and at The Robert Gordon University.

Member

Law Society of Scotland; Law Society of England and Wales; associate member CIArb (Chair designate of the Northern Chapter of The Scottish Branch ClArb).

Education

Westhill Academy, Aberdeenshire; University of Glasgow (1995 LLB Hons); University of Aberdeen (1996 Dip LP).

Leisure

Running, following the fortunes and misfortunes of Aberdeen Football Club, learning to play golf.

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