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Kennedys

25 FENCHURCH AVENUE, LONDON, EC3M 5AD, ENGLAND
Tel:
Work 020 7667 9667
Fax:
Fax 020 7667 9777
DX:
766 LONDON/CITY
Email:
Web:
www.kennedyslaw.com

Kennedys is a specialist national and international law firm with expertise in litigation and dispute resolution. It has over 1,950 people globally, across the UK and Europe, Asia Pacific, the Americas and the Middle East. Its lawyers provide a range of specialist legal services for many industries including: insurance and reinsurance, aviation, construction, employment, healthcare, maritime and international trade, public sector, retail, transport and logistics and travel – with a particular focus on dispute resolution and litigation.

The firm: Kennedys 'grew up' in the insurance industry, a sector known for its tight margins and intense focus on value-for-money. The firm has a deep understanding of the pressures on the client's bottom-line and has developed a reputation for providing straightforward, pragmatic advice cost-effectively.

Kennedys has a nationwide presence in the UK with offices in Belfast, Birmingham, Bristol, Cambridge, Chelmsford, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, Manchester, Sheffield and Taunton.

International: as well as eleven locations in the UK, Kennedys has offices in Auckland, Austin (TX), Bangkok, Basking Ridge (NJ), Bermuda, Bogota, Brussels, Buenos Aires, Chicago (IL), Copenhagen, Dubai, Dublin, Hong Kong, Lima, Lisbon, Madrid, Melbourne, Mexico City, Miami, Moscow, New York  (NY), Paris, Philadelphia (PA), Santiago, Singapore and Sydney and associated offices in Beijing, Bologna, Karachi, Lahore, Milan, Mumbai, New Delhi, Oslo, Rio de Janeiro, Rome, São Paulo, Shanghai, Shenzhen, Stockholm, Tel Aviv and Warsaw.

Types of work undertaken:Insurance/reinsurance: Kennedys undertakes coverage and defence work over all classes of business for a client base that includes: general insurers, global composites, Lloyd's syndicates, self-insured PLCs and self-insuring government bodies. The firm is particularly known for its work in the fields of property/energy, financial lines (including professional indemnity and D&O), excess of loss casualty and personal injury.

Construction: construction and engineering are a significant part of Kennedys' business, whether advising on construction and engineering matters for employers and contractors, on insurance claims arising under policies written in relation to a large number of construction and engineering projects, or on health and safety issues arising in those industries.

Liability: Kennedys acts on behalf of insurers for claims arising under public, employers', product and motor liability policies, as well as medical negligence, personal injury and compulsory insurance claims.

Healthcare: Kennedys has been advising hospitals, their insurers, trusts and healthcare professionals on clinical negligence and health law advice for over 20 years. The department acts for NHS Resolution, the National Health Service Litigation Authority, and for over 60 trusts and primary care trusts.

Rail sector: the firm has particular expertise in this area and handles a wide range of contentious matters such as public inquiries and investigations, police and HSE investigations, as well as prosecutions and health and safety issues.

Employment: Kennedys' employment team is highly experienced in dealing with the full raft of employment-related litigation, including wages, contract, discrimination and dismissal-related disputes, and large group action litigation (ie equal pay and TUPE). The team is equally well-versed in assisting clients with day-to-day HR issues and strategy.

Aviation: Kennedys has extensive experience in supporting, advising and representing the global aviation industry. The firm provides legal solutions for all aspects of aviation commercial and liability work.

Maritime and international trade: Kennedys' London marine team specialises in shipping and trade matters around the world, working closely with its Singapore, New Zealand and Spanish offices. Areas of expertise include commodities, financing, energy, marine, intermodal work, collision, salvage, and all manner of physical damage claims involving ships and their cargoes.

Property: Kennedys' real estate team covers the whole spectrum of property-related work including asset management, banking, corporate real estate, development, dispute resolution, investment (acquisitions and disposals), landlord and tenant, planning and rights of light, project finance, restructuring, insolvency and impaired assets.

Corporate: Kennedys advises clients on commercial dispute resolution and all aspects of change, including commercial contracts, corporate recovery and restructuring, cross-border, data protection, mergers and acquisitions and related work, procurement procedures, outsourcing, partnership, policy advice, property and regulation (including FCA regulation).

  • Number of UK partners: 232
  • Number of other UK fee-earners: 703

Above material supplied by Kennedys.

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