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HFW

LEVEL 39, BOURKE PLACE, 600 BOURKE STREET, MELBOURNE, VIC 3000, AUSTRALIA
Tel:
Work +61 3 8601 4500
Fax:
Fax +61 3 8601 4555
Web:
www.hfw.com
Abu Dhabi, Brussels, Dubai, Geneva, Hong Kong, Houston and 12 more

Nick Longley

Tel:
Work +61 (0)3 8601 4500
Email:
Web:
www.hfw.com
HFW

Work Department

Construction

Position

Partner

Career

Nick advises on construction and construction insurance law, focusing particularly on arbitration relating to major infrastructure and energy-related projects. He advises governments, employers, main contractors, specialist subcontractors, construction professionals and insurers on all aspects of construction law, including procurement, contract production and negotiation, claims preparation and dispute resolution. He also advises insurers and insureds on policy interpretation, claims and subrogated claims.

He is a fellow of The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, a director of ACICA and the Melbourne Commercial Arbitration and Mediation Centre. Nick is on the list of arbitrators at the HKIAC, a Grade 3 Resolution Institute arbitrator as well as being on the list of arbitrators held by the Asian International Arbitration Centre. Nick is admitted in England and Wales, Hong Kong and Victoria, Australia.

Nick used to work in both the Hong Kong and Melbourne office but is now based in Melbourne, working on projects all over the world.

Member

The Chartered Institute of Arbitrators, Law Society of Hong Kong's Insurance Law Committee, IAMA Accredited Arbitrator, HKIAC's List of Arbitrators.


Australia

Construction

Within: Construction

HFW fields ‘outstanding lawyerNick Longley, whose ‘advice is always useful to overcome issues’, and Alex McKellar, who ‘helped resolve issues that had been hurdles for several years’. The former relocated from the firm’s Hong Kong office to boost the Melbourne offering. Infrastructure and offshore construction are two key areas of expertise, and the team has seen recent growth in hotel, residential and mixed-use developments, where it frequently acts for Singaporean and Chinese clients. On the contentious side, it represented AECOM Services in multi-party proceedings before the NSW Supreme Court, arising from the construction of Sydney’s Lane Cove tunnel. Non-contentious work included advising Indonesian state-owned PT Sarana Multi Infrastruktur on the construction of a hospital in Sumatra. The team also includes the recommended Ian Gordon, who joined from Lander & Rogers; offshore construction expert Matthew Blycha; and disputes specialist Nick Watts.

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Dispute resolution

Within: Dispute resolution

HFW's team focuses on contentious work in the firm’s core areas of practice shipping and aviation, construction, insurance, energy and commodities. Practice head Nick Longley is an ‘outstanding lawyer’ whose ‘knowledge and appropriateness of advice meet expectations’; he specialises in construction litigation and acted for design firm Arcadis Australia in a claim arising out of its involvement in a Victorian road project. Insurance expert Richard Jowett, who has experience in class actions, is also singled out; Gavin Vallely, Matthew Blycha and Andrew Dunn are other names to note. Simon Shaddick and Brendan McCashin have been promoted to partner.

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Legal Developments by:
HFW

  • Business interruption insurance: importance of understanding cover

    Business interruption insurance is often a key component of a company’s business continuity plan. The insurance is designed to compensate an insured for the financial effect of the interruption or interference to that business as a result of physical damage to an insured property or other key external events, such as damage at a supplier’s or customer’s premises. The intention is to restore the business to the same financial position as if the loss had not occurred, subject always to the terms and conditions of the policy. 

    - Holman Fenwick Willan

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  • Communiqué on Equity Crowdfunding Is Officially Published

    By way of background, in January 2019, the Capital Markets Board (“ CMB ”) had issued an announcement on its website on the Draft Communiqué on Equity Crowdfunding [1] . The CMB has now officially published the Communiqué on Crowdfunding No. III-35/A (“ Communiqué ”), on October 3, 2019. The Communiqué entered into force as of October 3, 2019.
  • Beneficial Ownership Concept new interpretation from the Russian federal tax service

    The recent interpretative letter issued by the Russian Federal Tax Services (“FTS”) on 08th August 2019, has provided further guidance as to the application of the Beneficial Ownership Concept, further to the letter initially provided on the 12th of April 2018 which adopted a strict approach of the concept. 
  • Cyprus and Netherlands Double Tax Treaty Update

    Cyprus has concluded the negotiations for the avoidance of double taxation with the Netherlands. The double tax treaty was agreed at technocratic level in Hague. It is expected to be signed by the end of 2019 or early in 2020.
  • Vacancy - Senior Corporate Lawyer

    The Senior Corporate Lawyer, who will be reporting to Partners, will be working with both the firm’s legal team as well as the financial services team. The successful candidate will be requested to show initiative, take on certain responsibilities within the firm, work in a multinational environment and will immediately be given the opportunity to further advance their career within the law firm.
  • CJEU RULED ON THE APPLICATION OF THE BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP CONCEPT

    The judgment of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) on February 26, 2019, in the “Danish Beneficial Ownership Cases”, can be perceived as a landmark on the interpretation of the Beneficial Ownership concept under the Interest and Royalties Directive (IRD) and the Parent-Subsidiary Directive (PSD).
  • Court of Justice rules on source of income for Derivative Residence applications

    On 2 October 2019, the Court of Justice delivered its judgment in Bajratari v Secretary of State for the Home Department (Directive 2004/38/EC) Case C-93/18 which concerns Chen applications and the source of funds for self-sufficiency. 
  • End of the ‘centre of life test’ in Surinder Singh cases?

    In the recent case of  ZA (Reg 9. EEA Regs; abuse of rights) Afghanistan   [2019] UKUT 281 (IAC ), the Upper Tribunal found that there is no basis in EU law for the centre of life test, as set out in Regulation 9(3)(a) of the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016 (the “Regulations”). It further found that it is not to be applied when Judges assess  Surinder Singh  cases that appear before them.
  • ITALIAN RULES ON JOINT VENTURES IN PUBLIC PROCUREMENT AND CONCESSIONS

    Italian rules on jointventures concerning public procurement and concession contracts are set out inlight of the European legal framework provided for in Directive 2014/23/EU and 2014/24/EU of the European Parliament and of the Council. The European rules aim to ensurethe best use of public money so that EU citizens benefit from strategicinvestments and services at fair prices. In this context, public procurementand concessions represent key instruments that need to be regulated and standardisedin order to ensure free movement of goods, freedom of establishment and freedomto provide services.
  • Terms of employment as a sole representative

    In this article we examine the working arrangements of sole representatives, looking at the terms and conditions of employment that the Home Office will expect a sole representative to have in order to qualify as a representative of an overseas business.  
  • Can Sole Representatives Be Shareholders?

    The Immigration Rules require that an applicant for a  sole representative visa  is not “a  majority shareholder in the overseas business”.