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United States > Industry focus > Transport: shipping - regulation > Law firm and leading lawyer rankings

Editorial

Index of tables

  1. Transport: shipping - regulation
  2. Leading lawyers
  3. Next generation lawyers

Leading lawyers

  1. 1

Next generation lawyers

  1. 1
    • George Kontakis - K&L Gates
    • Robert Magovern - Cozen O'Connor

Who Represents Who

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Blank Rome LLP’s Washington DC-based maritime team handles administrative litigation and maritime investigations, government relations, risk mitigation and regulatory compliance. Jones Act expert Jonathan Waldron represented Chevron and the International Marine Contractors Association (IMCA) in response to a proposal by Customs and Border Protection to exclude the bulk of foreign-flagged vessels from operating in US waters. Matthew Thomas and Jeanne Grasso assist a number of energy companies with US sanctions compliance; Grasso also has expertise in ballast water compliance. Other key figures include Gregory Linsin, who has experience in fatal crash regulatory investigations, and Sean Pribyl, who joined from the Coast Guard to develop the department’s unmanned vessel and cybersecurity offering.

Trusted Advisor - with Finnegan

IP specialist Finnegan detail how their collaborative approach makes for a unique culture which is designed to allow them to work with clients in a way which is cognizant of the challenges facing all companies today.

Cozen O'Connor is noted for its expertise in Jones Act and cabotage advice, as well as for its work before the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) and for representing logistics providers, particularly intermodal providers. Department co-chair Jeffrey Lawrence advised Consolidated Chassis Management on maritime and antitrust issues concerning the company’s geographic expansion. Marc Fink and Robert Magovern handled the maritime regulatory and antitrust aspects of the formation of Ocean Alliance, a vessel-sharing alliance among major ocean carriers. New York-based Geoffrey Ferrer co-chairs the department, which includes Anne Mickey, who has expertise in economic and offshore regulatory compliance; Wayne Rohde, who has experience of FMC proceedings; and Stanley Sher. All lawyers are based in Washington DC unless otherwise stated.

Based in Louisiana, the maritime team at Jones Walker LLP is widely considered a go-to firm for administrative proceedings involving incidents in the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi River’s busy southern ports. Headed by Scott Jenkins, the group has unique experience of manning issues offshore, including immigration and citizenship concerns, outer continental shelf exemption and customs concerns. Robert Lemon’s expertise covers vessel and terminal transactions and advice in relation to fleeting operations on the Mississippi River. Kelly Duncan and Washington DC-based Christian Johnsen are additional contacts.

K&L Gates has deep-seated experience in the maritime industry, with a prolific legislative lobbying practice and expertise in the full range of regulatory issues facing the market. The team acts for numerous maritime coalitions including Global Ports Group and International Council of Containership Operators; Michael Scanlon serves as general counsel to the latter, while Mark Ruge advises American Maritime Partnership on issues such as cabotage and coastwise laws. Emanuel Rouvelas acts for Maersk Line in connection with US-flagging issues and defense-related federal programs such as the Maritime Security Program. Rouvelas has also acted for the Transportation Institute in the promotion of policy to sustain US-flagging requirements amid the US’ evolving international trade positions.

McGuireWoods LLP assists a wide range of corporates including logistics companies, port and terminal operators and shipping companies with shipping, maritime and international trade compliance. Based in Norfolk, practice head John Padgett is advising Colonna’s Shipyard on the process to construct and transport a dry dock from a Turkish shipyard to the US. Padgett’s other clients include APM Terminals, one of the world’s largest port and terminal operators, and logistics providers such as American Global Logistics, which he assists with issues relating to FMC licensing. Recent highlights have involved antidumping actions, customs audits and intermodal regulatory compliance. The firm’s governmental affairs subsidiary, McGuireWoods Consulting, provides lobbying advice in connection with port and terminal infrastructure development and shipping regulations.

Winston & Strawn LLP’s maritime lawyers are highly regarded for their expertise in Jones Act compliance and matters involving international trade. In addition to providing comprehensive compliance advice, the group has experience advocating before various key regulatory agencies. Charlie Papavizas regularly represents Liberty Maritime Corporation in the promotion of US-flagging policies. The team includes Allen Black and has a long track record advising clients in relation to criminal maritime investigations. Bryant Gardner and New York-based associate Brooke Shapiro have handled disputes concerning government contracts. The team defended Schuyler Line Navigation Company in bid protest litigation concerning its contract to supply Guantanamo Bay Naval Station. Gerald Morrissey is another contact in the department.

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Legal Developments worldwide

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Press Releases worldwide

The latest news direct from law firms. If you would like to submit press releases for your firm, send an email request to