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Editorial

Press releases and law firm thought leadership

This page is dedicated to keeping readers informed of the latest news and thought leadership articles from law firms across the globe.

If your firm wishes to publish press releases or articles, please contact Shehab Khurshid on +44 (0) 207 396 5689 or shehab.khurshid@legalease.co.uk

 

GTDT Shipping - India

Mr Shardul Thacker heads the shipping, oil and gas and banking practice group at Mulla & Mulla & Craigie Blunt & Caroe. Lloyd’s List ranked him third in their top 10 lawyers stating: “Highly regarded for his work in the liquefied natural gas sector, particularly for interesting and highly geared finance deals in relation to infrastructure projects, energy, ports and ships.” india_-_gtdt_shipping_

Chambers Guides - Insurance 2018 - India

India is a common-law jurisdiction. In general, Indian laws borrow heavily from, and are based on, English law. However, insurance law in India has certain unique features that deviate from English insurance law. The primary legislation of insurance law in India is the Insurance Act, 1938 (the “Insurance Act”) and the Insurance Rules, 1939 (the “Insurance Rules”).

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Transport Finance Review - India

The transportation industry – aviation, shipping and rail – has been predominantly owned by government entities since India’s independence in 1947. Air India and Indian Airlines, both government-owned, rules the skies; the Shipping Corporation of India (SCI), established in 1961 and owned by the government, owns and operates around one-third of the Indian tonnage. All railway property is government owned.

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International Arbitration Review - India

The Arbitration and Conciliation Act, 1996 (Act) provides the framework for arbitration and conciliation in India. Drafted on the basis of the UNCITRAL Model Law, it is divided into four parts. Each part governs a different aspect of the arbitration and conciliation process: a Part 1 governs commercial arbitration; b Part 2 governs the enforcement of certain foreign awards; c Part 3 governs conciliation; and d Part 4 contains supplementary provisions (regarding the power of the court to make rulings, etc.). The Act 2 was recently amended in 2016 with an aim to make it more robust by plugging the lacunae that existed in the original legislation.

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India - Chambers Guides - Shipping 2018

The ‘Law & Practice’ sections provide easily accessible information on navigating the legal system when conducting business in the jurisdiction. Leading lawyers explain local law and practice at key transactional stages and for crucial aspects of doing business.

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BRAND-JACKING

WHAT IS BRANDJACKING?

As the “Age of Social Media” grows exponentially, so does the variety and complexity of threats facing corporations. One of the newest and most damaging threats is that of “Brandjacking,” essentially the hijacking of brand’s online presence, typically on a social network. Coined by combination of two words “brand” & “jacking” – “Brandjacking”  usually refers to an activity whereby someone acquires or otherwise assumes the online identity of another entity for the purposes of acquiring that person’s or business’s brand equity. The people involved in carrying out these kinds of activities are known as “brand assassins”, who blatantly infiltrate upon the hard-earned and well established intellectual property of the brand / product over a prolonged period of time. Though the involved intermediaries have limited roles to play, serving just as a platform of utilization & hosting of the process for facilitation; there exists a huge legal divide which hinders their capacities.

Post Marketing Surveillance of Drugs

Post marketing surveillance is performed after market approval/clinical trials of drugs in India. The regulatory framework for conducting clinical trials of drugs is provided under the Drugs and Cosmetics Act, 1940 (“Act”) and the Drugs and Cosmetics Rules, 1945 (“Rules”). Further, Part X-A and Schedule Y of the Rules specifically deal with the statutory provisions applicable for clinical trial of drugs in India. Schedule Y divides Clinical trial of drugs into 4 Phases, namely, Human Pharmacology (Phase-I), Therapeutic exploratory trials (Phase-II), Therapeutic confirmatory trials (Phase III) and Post Marketing Trials (Phase-IV).

Protection of Biotechnology under Indian Laws

According to the eighth annual survey conducted by the Association of Biotechnology-Led Enterprises (ABLE) and Bio Spectrum, the Indian biotech industry grew threefold in just five years to report revenues of US$ 3 billion in 2009-10, a rise of 17 per cent over the previous year. Maintaining the momentum of the previous years, the Indian biotech industry grew 16.28 per cent in FY2014; the total industry size was US$ 5 billion at the end of the financial year and it reached US$ 7 billion in FY2015. Fast-paced growth is likely to continue; the industry is expected to increase in size to USD11.6 billion by 2017, driven by a range   of factors such as growing demand, intensive R & D activities and strong government initiatives (http://www.ibef.org/industry/biotechnology-india.aspx)

GC Powerlist -
India